Does co-locating welfare advice services improve mental health?

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Katie Evans from Money and Mental Health considers a recent study looking at the impact of co-located welfare advice in healthcare settings, which found significant improvements in financial outcomes, but less convincing results in terms of health benefits.

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Smartphone apps for depression: do they work?

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Michelle Eskinazi and Clara Belessiotis write their debut elf blog on a recent meta-analysis of smartphone‐based mental health interventions for depression, which concludes that there is a possibly promising role for apps in the prevention and treatment of sub-clinical, mild and moderate depressive symptoms.

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Non-medical use of prescription drugs #NonMedicalDrugs

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Ian Hamilton and Julia Buxton from the University of York preview the #NonMedicalDrugs event that will take place in York on Friday 16th March 2018.

The meeting will bring together people who can offer personal and professional insights of the extent of the issue and how we can support people who develop problems.

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Blended psychotherapy: barriers and facilitators identified by psychotherapists

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Stefan Rennick-Egglestone on a qualitative study of psychotherapists’ views about the barriers and facilitators to implementing blended psychotherapy for depression.

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SSRIs and suicidality: effects of SSRIs on rating-scale-assessed suicidality in adults with depression

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Rina Dutta and Patrick McLaughlin summarise a new study looking at the effects of SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) on rating-scale-assessed suicidality in adults with depression.

This study published in the British Journal of Psychiatry supports the conclusion that SSRIs remain a safe and effective treatment in depression for those aged 18 and over.

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The prevalence of digital self-harm among adolescents

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Alexander Foster and Tatiana Salisbury publish their debut blog on a recent study of digital self-harm in adolescents. In case you’re wondering, digital self-harm is the anonymous online posting, sending or sharing of hurtful content about oneself.

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Antidepressants can help adults with major depression

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André Tomlin reports on a new network meta-analysis that brings together the best available evidence comparing the efficacy and acceptability of 21 antidepressants for the acute treatment of adults with major depressive disorder.

This groundbreaking review of 522 trials is the largest ever meta-analysis in psychiatry, and finds that antidepressants are more effective than placebo for short-term treatment of acute depression in adults.

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Prevention and early intervention for youth mental illness: how should we focus our limited resources? #MQScienceMeeting

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André Tomlin presents a summary of all the evidence we have highlighted over the last 3 years relating to prevention and early intervention for mental illness in young people.

This blog accompanies the #MQScienceMeeting coverage this week, which you can follow on Twitter.

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Antidepressants for depression in schizophrenia: when good-enough evidence is good enough

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Carmine Pariante is positive about a recent systematic review and meta-analysis of antidepressants for the treatment of depression in schizophrenia.

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The Origins of Happiness: can we predict life satisfaction?

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Paul Ramchandani considers the methods, findings and implications of a new book by Andrew E. Clark, Sarah Fleche, Richard Layard, Nattavudh Powdthavee and George Ward, entitled: ‘The Origins of Happiness: The science of well-being over the life course’.

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