Blue Whale Challenge and suicide contagion

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Holly Crudgington reviews a qualitative study that examines the self-harm and suicide contagion effects of the Blue Whale Challenge on YouTube and Twitter.

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Online support for people with suicidal thoughts: what do users think?

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Laura Caven reviews a recent qualitative study that looks at what people think of the online support that is available from charities and other organisations for people with suicidal thoughts.

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Hearing voices: experiences of children and young people #CAMHScampfire

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Hearing voices is common in young people. In this #CAMHScampfire blog, Douglas Badenoch looks at a new qualitative study of the experiences of people aged 13-18 who hear voices but who do not have any clinical diagnosis.

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Acute hospital wards: caring for people with mental health problems

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Kate Chartres summarises a recent qualitative study that provides a greater understanding of the experience of delivering care to people with mental health problems in an acute hospital.

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Do prisons have more room for emotions than we think? Staff views on the link between suicide, violence and emotions

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Eleana Frisira reviews a recent qualitative study, which asks prison staff for their views about the role of emotions in prisoner suicide and violence.

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What do people with bipolar really pay attention to when they are monitoring their mood?

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Charlotte Walker reviews a recent qualitative study on monitoring mood in bipolar disorder, which suggests that people with lived experience should customise monitoring questions to create a more responsive, personalised approach.

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Humour as a tool for practice

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This study explores the use of humour as a practice tool in social care, drawing on the humour-health hypothesis as the premise of the investigation and identifying both positive and negative impacts that definitely warrant some more thought and exploration. The Elves are not new to the idea that humour can be an important tool [read the full story…]

Harm reduction for young people who self-harm: “a double-edged sword”

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Rachel Rowan Olive thinks through a recent qualitative study about young peoples’ perspectives on the role of harm reduction techniques in the management of their self-harm.

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Experience of psychotropic medication and decision-making

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Jennifer Rose Oulton reviews a qualitative study that explores the experiences of psychotropic medication use and decision-making for adults with learning disabilities and their carers.

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Stopping antidepressants: patient perspectives on barriers and facilitators

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Timothy Nyugen and Dafni Katsampa summarise a qualitative review of patient perspectives on the barriers and facilitators to stopping antidepressants.

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