Patients as “domain experts” in artificial intelligence mental health research

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Simon D’Alfonso summarises an editorial by Sarah Carr, which places the patient as a “domain expert” in artificial intelligence mental health research.

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Exploring drop-out rates: new review shows poor retention in trials of apps for depression

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In his debut blog, Tom Steare summarises a systematic review looking at drop out rates in randomised controlled trials of smartphone apps for depression, which finds that depression apps with mood monitoring and human feedback were associated with greater retention of research participants.

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If you really want to know if a digital mental health tool has impact, ignore the trial: read the analytics

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Terry Fleming writes her debut elf blog on a recent study that systemically examines the usage patterns of self-help mental health apps using independently gathered internet traffic data.

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Digital technology for better mental health services: perspectives from Australia and the USA

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Maria Giorgalli summarises a recent review on the use of digital technology to improve mental health services, based on the healthcare systems of Australia and the USA.

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Quit playing games with my… head? Online therapeutic games for LGBTQ+ youth #MindTech2019

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Will Koehler writes his debut Mental Elf blog on an exploratory study about how LGBT youth use the internet in relation to their mental health.

Follow #MindTech2019 on Twitter today to hear more from the lead author Mathijs Lucassen about this and other recent digital mental health research.

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Poor insight in psychosis predicts higher mental healthcare service use

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In Joseph Lam’s debut blog he explores a recent research paper which uses an electronic dataset to investigate the relationship between insight and service use in first episode psychosis.

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Developing engaging online interventions for people with psychosis

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Simon Bradstreet explores a recent Australia study, which looks at individual- and intervention-level engagement with online interventions for people with psychosis, and discovers some of the things that can predict engagement with online psychosocial support.

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The science of suicide prevention: Innovative technologies and ethical implications #IASP2019

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Tiago Zortea and Karen Wetherall help us prepare for the 30th World Congress of the International Association for Suicide Prevention #IASP2019, which is taking place in Derry this week. This blog summarises what we know about the potential for digital technologies (smartphones, machine learning and virtual reality) to help improve suicide prevention.

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Teens, screens and a hill of beans?

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Lucinda Powell looks at a recent study which finds little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being.

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Is too much screen time bad for our children? Perhaps, but how much do we really know?

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David Turgoose explores a systematic review of reviews that looks at the effects of screen time on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. The review found that higher levels of screen time were related to some physical and mental health concerns, such as poor diet, obesity and depression.

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