self-harm

Self-harm is not usually an attempt at taking our own life, but a way of expressing deep emotional feelings, such as low self-esteem. It is also a way to cope with traumatic events or situations, such as the death of a loved one, or an abusive relationship. Self-harm is not an illness, it is an expression of personal distress.

Our self-harm Blogs

Does self-harm in young people increase the risk of subsequent suicide?

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Pooky Knightsmith picks apart a recent Swedish cohort study, which found that all youths presenting to a clinical setting with self-harm were at an elevated future risk of suicide.

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Family therapy for adolescent self-harm: SHIFT trial says it doesn’t reduce hospital visits and isn’t cost-effective

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Udita Iyengar and Dennis Ougrin consider the findings of the SHIFT trial, which explored the effectiveness of systemic family therapy versus treatment as usual for young people after self-harm.

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The prevalence of digital self-harm among adolescents

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Alexander Foster and Tatiana Salisbury publish their debut blog on a recent study of digital self-harm in adolescents. In case you’re wondering, digital self-harm is the anonymous online posting, sending or sharing of hurtful content about oneself.

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Mental illness and neurobiological correlates in the transgender population

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Dean Connolly publish their debut blog on a literature review of transgender research, which reports on the prevalence of mental illness in the transgender population.

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Blended therapy for men who self-harm #DigiMHweek

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Olivia Kirtley looks at a qualitative study of a blended therapy using problem solving therapy with a customised smartphone app in men who present to hospital with intentional self-harm.

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Future self-harm may be reduced with a brief psychological intervention, but perhaps only for the more severe

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Angharad de Cates explores a recent RCT of a brief psychological intervention to reduce repetition of self-harm in patients admitted to hospital following a suicide attempt.

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Trauma-related childhood hospital admission linked with self-harm and violent crime in young adults

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Emily Stapley summarises a recent Danish national cohort study, which looks at self-harm and violent criminality among young people who experienced trauma-related childhood hospital admission.

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Predicting suicide following self-harm: risk analysis provides little help

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Camille Hart, Alys Cole-King and Siobhan O’Neill co-author this blog about a recent systematic review of risk factors and risk scales, which explores the feasibility of predicting suicide following self-harm.

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Lithium for bipolar disorder: the best maintenance mood stabiliser protection against self-harm and suicide?

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Michael Ostacher provides a robust appraisal of a recent UK cohort study that suggests bipolar disorder patients taking lithium had reduced self-harm and unintentional injury rates, when compared with patients taking valproate, olanzapine or quetiapine.

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Locked wards vs open wards: does control = safety?

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André Tomlin summarises a 15 year observational study published today in The Lancet Psychiatry, which provides fascinating insight into suicide risk and absconding in psychiatric inpatient units with locked wards and open door policies.

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