self-harm

Self-harm is not usually an attempt at taking our own life, but a way of expressing deep emotional feelings, such as low self-esteem. It is also a way to cope with traumatic events or situations, such as the death of a loved one, or an abusive relationship. Self-harm is not an illness, it is an expression of personal distress.

Our self-harm Blogs

Ketamine and suicidal ideation: French trial finds modest short-term effects

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Anya Borissova reviews a French trial that claims to be evidence that “ketamine is rapid, safe in the short term, and has persistent benefits for acute care in suicidal patients”.

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Improving our understanding of the links between loneliness and mental health problems

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Zuva Dengu summaries a review of longitudinal studies investigating the relationship between loneliness and new onset of mental health problems in the general population.

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Suicide risk among LGBTQ+ adolescents in Canada

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Jess Williams examines a nationally representative population-based study on suicidality among sexual minority and transgender adolescents in Canada.

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Trans and gender diverse youth more likely to be admitted to hospital for suicidality and self-harm, according to US study

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Sarah Carr reflects on a recent US study that “perhaps tells us something deeper about the discrimination and stigmatisation in mental health that needs to be tackled.”

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What’s the link between neurodevelopmental or mental disorders and school absence or exclusion?

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Chris Fielding summarises a Welsh cohort study which finds that neurodevelopmental and mental disorders are linked to school absenteeism and exclusion.

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Can smartphone apps help female adolescents who self-harm?

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Natalie Kashirsky summarises a qualitative study finding that young people think “smartphone apps are cool”, but possibly unhelpful for coping with self-harm.

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Intimate partner violence, suicide and self-harm: uncovering the links

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Piumee Bandara summarises a cross-sectional study which finds that people who had experienced lifetime intimate partner violence (IPV) were almost three times more likely to have made a suicide attempt in the past year, compared to people without experience of IPV.

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Self-harm in autistic people: meta-analysis confirms higher risk compared to non-autistic people

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In her debut blog, Mirabel Pelton summarises a systematic review finding that autistic people are at 3-fold greater risk of self-harm compared to non-autistic people.

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ICU survivors at increased risk of suicide and self-harm after discharge

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Charlotte Huggett reviews a recent Canadian population-based cohort study, which examines rates of suicide and self-harm in adult survivors of critical illness.

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Low intensity treatments for self-harm or suicidal behaviour: what’s the harm in trying?

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Millie Witcher and Sarah Rowe appraise a randomised controlled trial on the effect of low-intensity treatments for self-harm among people with suicidal ideation, which has some important findings.

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