self-harm

Self-harm is not usually an attempt at taking our own life, but a way of expressing deep emotional feelings, such as low self-esteem. It is also a way to cope with traumatic events or situations, such as the death of a loved one, or an abusive relationship. Self-harm is not an illness, it is an expression of personal distress.

Our self-harm Blogs

Self-harm in older adults: a forgotten group?

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Karen Birnie, Haridha Pandian and Derek Tracy summarise a recent systematic review in the British Journal of Psychiatry on self-harm in older adults.

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Using data to inform suicide and self-harm prevention #SelfHarmData

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Karen Wetherall summarises the new NatCen report on suicide and self-harm in Britain: researching risk and resilience using UK surveys.

Follow #SelfHarmData on Twitter for all the discussions from the ‘Using data to inform suicide and self-harm prevention’ event in London.

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Transforming mental health throughout the life course #MQScienceMeeting 2019

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André Tomlin sets the scene for the 2019 #MQScienceMeeting which brings together researchers across different disciplines to explore cutting-edge new ways to understand, treat and prevent mental illness.

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BlueIce app for managing self-harm: what do young people think?

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Bethan Davies shares her thoughts on a qualitative study of service users’ experience about the acceptability, use and safety of the BlueIce app for young people who self-harm.

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Does self-harm in young people increase the risk of subsequent suicide?

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Pooky Knightsmith picks apart a recent Swedish cohort study, which found that all youths presenting to a clinical setting with self-harm were at an elevated future risk of suicide.

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Family therapy for adolescent self-harm: SHIFT trial says it doesn’t reduce hospital visits and isn’t cost-effective

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Udita Iyengar and Dennis Ougrin consider the findings of the SHIFT trial, which explored the effectiveness of systemic family therapy versus treatment as usual for young people after self-harm.

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The prevalence of digital self-harm among adolescents

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Alexander Foster and Tatiana Salisbury publish their debut blog on a recent study of digital self-harm in adolescents. In case you’re wondering, digital self-harm is the anonymous online posting, sending or sharing of hurtful content about oneself.

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Mental illness and neurobiological correlates in the transgender population

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Dean Connolly publish their debut blog on a literature review of transgender research, which reports on the prevalence of mental illness in the transgender population.

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Blended therapy for men who self-harm #DigiMHweek

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Olivia Kirtley looks at a qualitative study of a blended therapy using problem solving therapy with a customised smartphone app in men who present to hospital with intentional self-harm.

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Future self-harm may be reduced with a brief psychological intervention, but perhaps only for the more severe

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Angharad de Cates explores a recent RCT of a brief psychological intervention to reduce repetition of self-harm in patients admitted to hospital following a suicide attempt.

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