Results: 32

For: profound and multiple learning disability

A Suitable Person: An insider perspective finds conflict between parent-carers and practitioners


Earlier this year, we posted about a study which showed positive outcomes being achieved by suitable persons for individuals lacking capacity to consent to direct payments.

Here Alex Leeder, who blogged about this study, looks at the views of parent-carers who have fulfilled the role of ‘suitable person’ – an ‘insider’ perspective.

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Factors which impact on the social networks of people with profound intellectual disabilities


In this blog, Sian Anderson looks at a study that seeks to discover the factors, which can most positively impact on the development and maintenance of the informal social networks of people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

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Affect attunement: adding to practice?

mencap PMLD

Affect attunement has been described in the literature as reflecting back emotions and feelings projected by a person in order to create a connection.

Here Paul Barnard looks at a paper exploring ways in which support workers might be using this approach in their work with people with profound and multiple learning disabilities.

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Is intensive interaction effective?


Intensive interaction is an accepted approach to working with people with learning disabilities and/or autism, but how much do we know about its effectiveness?

Here, Katherine Runswick Cole looks at a review of literature that addresses this question.

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Challenging behaviour in profound & multiple learning disabilities: is support well planned and documented?


The lives of some people with profound and multiple learning disabilities are affected by challenging behaviours, which include self-injurious, stereotypical, destructive, or aggressive behaviours.

Here in his debut blog, Paul Barnard looks at a study from the Netherlands which looked at whether challenging behaviour was being addressed formally in day to day practice.

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Link between healthcare use and eating drinking and swallowing difficulties in people with learning disabilities


Estimates suggest that dysphagia affects 8% of all adults with learning disabilities and that 15% require some form of mealtime support.

Here we report on a study that set out to look at the association between the need for support with eating, drinking and swallowing difficulties and the use of primary and secondary healthcare services.

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Achieving increases in active support through practice leadership needs systematic development of skills and management focus says exploratory study


Active support is about ensuring staff have working practices and organisational procedures to improve levels of participation and engagement in activities.

In her debut blog for the Learning Disabilities Elf, Louise Philips describes a study which set out to look at whether the quality of practice leadership was a factor in developing active support.

Louise also sets out an excellent breakdown of exactly what practice leadership is what managers need to do to ensure this framework for practice development is robust.

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Judgements about learning disability services quality based on snapshot experiences were not sufficient to understand service performance in Australian study


What needs to be done to ensure quality services for adults with profound and multiple learning disabilities and how can organisations ensure that this is done consistently?

Here, Nick Burton describes the findings of an Australian study that uses observational methodology to look in great detail at what was happening for a number of people in small 24hr staffed houses for four to six people.

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Confidential Inquiry into premature deaths WeLD Nurses tweet chat with authors and the LD Elf


Following our recent post on what has happened since the publication of the CIPOLD Confidential Inquiry report, we joined a tweet chat hosted by WeLDNurses with two of the report’s authors: Pauline Heslop and Matt Hoghton.

It was a really lively hour with some fantastic contributions. Here we present a summary of the comments with some links to information that was mentioned during the chat itself.

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Using Thickness Indicator Model tubes help staff to accurately modify fluid consistency when supporting people with dysphagia

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When choking risk is identified for people with learning disabilities and fluid consistency modification is prescribed, it is critical that staff get the consistency right. Here we report on an efficacy study which looked at whether the use of Thickness Indicator Model tubes as a visual aid in training improved the efficacy of staff training.

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