The complexity of daily living for people with Acquired Brain Injury

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Andy Mantell reviews a study by Giles and colleagues (2018), looking at the interrelationship between ‘activities of daily living’ (ADLs) and ‘instrumental activities of daily living’ (IADLs), among people living in the community, following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

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The costs of care prior to institutionalisation among people living with Alzheimer’s disease

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The past few decades have seen a gradual shift of provision of services for older people from residential care to community-based care in the UK and other high-income countries. ‘Ageing in place’ is a widely accepted and supported discourse. In practice, receiving care at home enables older people to stay in a familiar environment, and [read the full story…]

A ‘temperature check’ survey of local authority staff about implementing Making Safeguarding Personal

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Caroline Norrie’s blog considers findings from a telephone survey of local authority staff in England about progress implementing the ‘Making Safeguarding Personal’ approach.

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Advance care planning in dementia nursing homes with family carers

Josie Dixon considers a paired-cluster randomised controlled trial of an advance care planning intervention, called the Family Carer Decision Support (FCDS) intervention, undertaken by Kevin Brazil and colleagues (2018) in dementia nursing homes.

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How many ways do they need to say it? Young autistic people need support for their mental health.

Autistic people with mental health needs are clear that they need specialised services and these can only be effective if people are properly trained in both mental health and autism.

Vaso Totsika’s blog considers a study by Crane and colleagues, which seeks to further our understanding of how young autistic people experience the world of service provision in relation to their mental health needs, and in particular at the time of transition from child to adult services.

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‘Well – what do you know?’ Insights into information work among carers of people living with dementia

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Jill Manthorpe’s blog considers findings from a scoping review and institutional ethnography of the ‘information work’ done by family carers of community-dwelling older adults living with dementia, by Dalmer (2018).

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Subjective experiences trump hard evidence: older people’s choice of residential care

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Kate Baxter reviews a study by Trigg et al. (2018) which explores and compares the type and quantity of information that makes people feel comfortable when choosing a residential care home in the UK, Netherlands and Spain.

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Direct funding and older people: why are we still talking about choice?

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Francesca Pozzoli considers a qualitative metasynthesis of directly funded home-care programmes for older people and the concept of ‘choice’.

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Parents and volunteers’ experiences of family support

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Jo Moriarty’s blog looks at parents and volunteers’ experiences of Home-Start, a family support programme, via the theoretical framework of liminality.

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Considering the realities and constraints in coproducing research

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Mike Clark’s blog considers a paper in which the authors reflect on tensions arising in the coproduction of adult social care evaluation between the participatory research approach and validated outcome measures.

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