suicide

Suicide is the act of intentionally ending your life.

There are three levels of intervention in suicide; 1) universal 2) selective and 3) indicated.

Universal interventions target everyone in a defined population. They aim to increase awareness about suicide, remove barriers to care, promote help-seeking and encourage protective factors. Some examples of universal interventions include school-based interventions and national initiatives such as restricted access to lethal means. Evidence suggests that universal interventions are effective at increasing awareness and helping skills, though there is little evidence to suggest they’re effective at reducing suicide-related thoughts or behaviours.

Selective interventions address specific groups at increased risk for suicidal behaviours, for instance those with mental health problems or harmful use of substances. To date, there have been few studies into selective interventions and results are mixed.

Indicated interventions target high-risk individuals already displaying signs of suicidal behaviour. Examples include brief contact interventions (e.g. crisis cards) and talking therapies. Evidence suggests that brief contact interventions are effective for young people in clinical settings. A network meta-analysis conducted in 2021 found that the most effective talking therapies for suicide and self-harm in young people are dialectical behavioural therapies and mentalisation-based therapies.

 

Our suicide Blogs

Cyber-victimisation may be associated with self-injurious thoughts and behaviours

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Holly Crudgington looks at a systematic review exploring the links between social media, cyberbullying, suicide and self-harm, which identifies a link between being victimised online and suicidal behaviour, thoughts and self-harm.

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Borderline personality disorder criteria and suicidality

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Steven Macdonald-Hart summarises a 10-year follow-up study from the US, which measures the relationship between borderline personality disorder and suicide attempts.

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Can hip-hop music help to prevent suicide?

The findings open new pathways for research to deepen our understanding of promoting positive mental health through music and mitigating the risks of sharing lived experiences in the lyrics.

Olufemi Talabi reviews a recent study exploring the association between Logic’s hip-hop song “1-800-273-8255” with Lifeline calls and suicides in the United States.

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Suicide in women: laws that discriminate against women may explain higher rates in low and middle income countries

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Grace Crowley summarises a study which suggests that policy makers working to reduce women’s suicide in low- and middle-income countries should target laws discriminating against women.

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Mental health apps for people in crisis: helpful or harmful?

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Wouter van Ballegooijen summarises a review of the ‘best apps’ for mental health, which finds very little support for people experiencing a mental health crisis.

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How living alone, loneliness and lack of emotional support link to suicide and self-harm

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Yutung Ng reviews a cohort study exploring the links between loneliness, living alone and emotional support with suicidality and self-harm.

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Ketamine “shows promise” as an anti-suicidal ideation agent, but will this promise ever be realised?

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Rosalind McAlpine and Karel Kieslich summarise a recent systematic review which focuses on the rapid anti-suicidal ideation effect of ketamine.

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Male suicide prevention: uncovering the challenges associated with “talking”

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Cara Richardson explores a recent qualitative study conducted in Scotland, which finds that the contexts in which men talk about suicide are an important part of male suicide prevention.

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Alexithymia and suicide, violence, and dual harm in male prisoners

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Ross Nedoma reviews a recent cross-sectional study examining the links between alexithymia and suicide, violence or dual harm among male prisoners in the UK.

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Risk factors for suicide in men: new review highlights substance misuse, marital status and depression

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Holly Crudgington summarises a recent systematic review and narrative synthesis of risk factors for suicidal behaviour in men, which finds that substance misuse, marital status and depression are the strongest risk factors.

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