schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a long-term mental health condition that causes a range of different psychological symptoms. These include: hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that do not exist), delusions (unusual beliefs that are not based on reality and often contradict the evidence), muddled thoughts based on the hallucinations or delusions, and changes in behaviour. Doctors describe schizophrenia as a psychotic illness. This means that sometimes a person may not be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Our schizophrenia Blogs

How to improve oral health in people with severe mental illness #MindYourSmile

Start tweeting your ideas to #MindYourSmile now!

Easter Joury summarises a recent systematic review on improving oral health in people with severe mental illness.

We are having a tweet chat at 8-9pm BST on Monday 11th July to discuss how best to support oral health in people with severe mental illness. You can join in by following the #MindYourSmile hashtag on Twitter.

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The global burden of disease from mental disorders remains high

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Alejandro Arguelles Bullon summarises the latest Global Burden of Disease study (2019) looking at the prevalence, incidence and impact that mental disorders have on our lives, which shows no reduction in the burden over the last 30 years.

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Oral health self-care behaviours in people with a serious mental illness

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This review of the of oral health self-care behaviours in people with serious mental illness (SMI) included 33 studies. Most of the included studies (18) were cross-sectional and a mjority (20)were considered to be of weak design.

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Choosing between antipsychotics to reduce the risk of breast cancer in women with schizophrenia

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Peter Knapp and Suzy Ker review a recent study from Finland, which suggests that women with schizophrenia who take prolactin-increasing antipsychotics for at least five years, have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.

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Is virtual reality the future of schizophrenia spectrum therapy?

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Stefanie Sturm blogs a systematic review which finds sparse, but promising support for the use of virtual reality to treat schizophrenia spectrum disorder.

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The potential of virtual reality to address social functioning impairments in people with psychosis

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Andie Ashdown and Theophanis Kyriacou summarise a systematic review on virtual reality-based assessment and treatment of social functioning impairments in psychosis.

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Prison and mental illness: the unmet needs associated with reincarceration

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Danny Whiting reviews a recent Canadian prison study which finds that schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and homelessness are some of the factors significantly associated with reincarceration.

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Death from COVID-19: should we be prioritising people with schizophrenia for vaccination?

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In her debut blog, Aneta Zarska reviews a cohort study which looks at the links between death from COVID-19 and a range of mental health conditions, including schizophrenia, depression and anxiety.

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Long-acting injectable antipsychotics: more effective than oral medications at preventing hospitalisation and relapse in schizophrenia according to new review

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Joseph Pierre appraises a recent meta-analysis on long-acting injectable antipsychotics compared to oral antipsychotic medication for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia.

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Ending self-stigma: not at all straightforward

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Dave Steele summarises a recent randomised controlled trial, which suggests that there may be benefit in self-stigma programmes for those with severe mental illness, but more work is needed.

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