schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a long-term mental health condition that causes a range of different psychological symptoms. These include: hallucinations (hearing or seeing things that do not exist), delusions (unusual beliefs that are not based on reality and often contradict the evidence), muddled thoughts based on the hallucinations or delusions, and changes in behaviour. Doctors describe schizophrenia as a psychotic illness. This means that sometimes a person may not be able to distinguish their own thoughts and ideas from reality.

Our schizophrenia Blogs

Walk this way: can a health coaching intervention increase physical activity in people with severe mental illness?

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Gordon Johnston and Michel Syrett prepare for the #HealthSMI event on 24th June by blogging about a recent pilot RCT of a health coaching intervention (Walk This Way) to reduce sedentary behaviour and increase physical activity in people with serious mental illness.

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Sex and schizophrenia: what determines sexual interest and confidence?

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In her debut blog, Beccy White summarises a secondary analysis which explored predictors of sexual interest amongst older adults with schizophrenia.

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Antipsychotics for schizophrenia: do they provide a longer, healthier life?

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Paul Heron from the Closing the Gap Network writes his debut blog about a 20‐year cohort study of physical morbidity and mortality in relationship to antipsychotic treatment in a huge group of people with schizophrenia in Finland.

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Psychological resilience to suicidal thoughts and behaviours in people with schizophrenia

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Emily Hielscher reviews a recent qualitative study that examines factors that contribute to psychological resilience to suicidal thoughts and behaviours in people with schizophrenia or psychosis.

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Flu pandemics, schizophrenia and the immune system: could history repeat itself?

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Sameer Jauhar summarises a recent narrative review about the risk of schizophrenia linked to the Spanish Influenza Pandemic over 100 years ago. He relates this work to our current pandemic and considers the possibility of a link between COVID-19 and an increased risk of psychosis.

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Cardiovascular risk in severe mental illness: is there a right intervention?

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A group of Masters Students from the University of Glasgow Global Mental Health MSc write about the Primrose trial, which looked at the clinical and cost-effectiveness of an intervention for reducing cholesterol and cardiovascular risk in severe mental illness.

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Risperidone and aripiprazole: genotype, metabolism and dosage

CYP2D6 genotyping before starting treatment might be valuable in clinical practice for individualising risperidone and aripiprazole treatment.

Dolly Sud writes her debut elf blog on a recent retrospective analysis, which compares dose changes of risperidone and aripiprazole with patients’ individual genotype.

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Antipsychotics and metabolic function in people with schizophrenia

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Peter Haddad and Sami Ouanes review a network meta-analysis of the impact of antipsychotic drugs on metabolic function in people with schizophrenia.

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What are the people hearing voices saying?

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A group of psychiatrists from the Springfield University Hospital Journal Club summarise a recent qualitative study about the socioeconomic factors involved in recovery for people with psychosis.

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Cancer screening disparities in people with mental illness

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Emily Peckham from the Closing The Gap Network writes her debut blog on a new systematic review, which finds that people with mental illnesses were less likely to receive screening for cancer compared to the general population.

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