Reminiscence therapy for people living with dementia: Cochrane review is inconclusive

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Liz Collier and Solomon Towuru summarise the recently updated Cochrane systematic review on reminiscence therapy for dementia, which includes evidence showing that reminiscence therapy may improve quality of life, cognition, communication and possibly mood in people with dementia in some circumstances, although all the benefits were small.

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Mental Health Act review: the demise of the nearest relative?

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Kathryn Berzins considers the implications of a recent rapid systematic review of the views and experiences of the Nearest Relative provision of the Mental Health Act (1983).

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Medication for ADHD: what works for adults, adolescents and children

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Dean Connolly is impressed by a recent systematic review and network meta-analysis, which compares the efficacy and tolerability of medication for ADHD in children, young people and adults.

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Genetic predictors of depression trajectories in adolescence

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Megan Skelton explores a study that uses polygenic scores in the context of longitudinal developmental data, to characterise developmental trajectories and the role of neuropsychiatric genetic risk variants in early-onset depression.

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Decision-making capacity of inpatients with schizophrenia: don’t assume people are incapable

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Mental Health Masters Students from UCL summarise a recent cross-sectional study on the association of decision-making capacity for treatment and research in inpatients with schizophrenia and related psychoses.

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Youth suicide prevention research needs a shake-up: lives depend on it

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Pooky Knightsmith appraises a systematic review and meta-analysis entitled: “What Works in Youth Suicide Prevention?”. She is disappointed that the review does not answer the question it sets, but sees this as a call to action for better quality research to help save lives.

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BlueIce app for managing self-harm: what do young people think?

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Bethan Davies shares her thoughts on a qualitative study of service users’ experience about the acceptability, use and safety of the BlueIce app for young people who self-harm.

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Lack of wealth may increase our risk of dementia

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A group of UCL Mental Health Masters students summarise a recent cohort study of the individual and area-based socioeconomic factors associated with dementia incidence in England.

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Treating men with eating disorders: do we need gender-specific care?

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Una Foye explores the implications of a recent qualitative study of clinicians’ views on treatment adaptations for men with eating disorders.

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Evidence-based school-based mental health programmes; the extent of their implementation worldwide

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Tamsin Ford considers a literature review of the scope, scale, and dose of the world’s largest school-based mental health programmes, which suggests that evidence-based programmes have reached millions of children worldwide, but mainly in high income countries.

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