ADHD remission: why do some children ‘outgrow’ ADHD whilst others don’t?

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A group of UCL Mental Health Masters students summarise a recent literature review that explores the potential pathways to ADHD remission.

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What causes Autistic Spectrum Disorder?

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Ben Janaway explores a recent review in JAMA Psychiatry on the emerging clinical neuroscience of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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Emotional symptoms in adolescent girls: what can we learn from the functional connectivity of neural pathways?

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Shubhangi Karmaker on a recent resting-state fMRI study that explores neural network disturbances that underpin the emergence of emotional symptoms in adolescent girls.

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Resilience to depression: neural markers in adolescent at-risk females

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Matthew Broome appraises a recent cohort study that looks at neural markers of resilience in young women at familial risk for major depressive disorder.

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MRI in first episode psychosis

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Dan Joyce publishes his debut blog on a recent paper in the British Journal of Psychiatry that considers the feasibility and clinical utility of magnetic resonance imaging in first-episode psychosis.

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CBTp changes the brain’s wiring? Extraordinary claims, ordinary evidence

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Keith Laws and Samei Huda are not impressed by a study on brain connectivity changes following CBT for psychosis, which received a significant amount of press coverage when it was published back in January.

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Microglial activity in psychosis and schizophrenia

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Samei Huda summarises a small PET brain imaging study, which looks at two cohorts (Ultra High Risk of Psychosis v Controls and Schizophrenia v Controls) to compare relative levels of microglial activity.

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Placebo responding and µ-opioid brain functioning predict efficiency of antidepressants

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Dan-Mikael Ellingsen explores the neurochemistry of placebo effects in major depression, as he reviews a recent study of the association between placebo-activated neural systems and antidepressant responses.

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Imaging genomics: can we link genes to brain structure and function?

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Linking brain scans with genetic information offers a powerful way to further our understanding of how the brain works, but to do this properly many researchers from around the world need to collaborate. Fortunately, the ENIGMA Consortium are leading the way in this emerging field of imaging genomics.

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Antidepressants work by changing emotional processing

The road to recovery can be long and people need time and space to

For people who are suffering from a severe depression, antidepressants are a very effective treatment, but how they work is still not fully understood.  The basic biochemistry of how one dose of the drug affects one part of the nervous system is known, e.g. increasing serotonin levels at the synapse by preventing it from being [read the full story…]