Developing engaging online interventions for people with psychosis

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Simon Bradstreet explores a recent Australia study, which looks at individual- and intervention-level engagement with online interventions for people with psychosis, and discovers some of the things that can predict engagement with online psychosocial support.

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Too much of a good thing: the cognitive impact of problematic internet use

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Matthew Kube-Clare reviews a recent meta-analysis on the impact of Problematic Internet Usage on different domains of cognition. The review concluded that Problematic Internet Use was associated with significant cognitive impairment.

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Teens, screens and a hill of beans?

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Lucinda Powell looks at a recent study which finds little clear-cut evidence that screen time decreases adolescent well-being.

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Is too much screen time bad for our children? Perhaps, but how much do we really know?

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David Turgoose explores a systematic review of reviews that looks at the effects of screen time on the health and well-being of children and adolescents. The review found that higher levels of screen time were related to some physical and mental health concerns, such as poor diet, obesity and depression.

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Innovation case studies point to a co-productive approach acknowledging risk taking and organisational development

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Alison Turner summarises a new digital report from the King’s Fund, which features a range of case studies highlighting how innovations have improved patient care and experience.

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New telehealth toolkit for commissioners to support technology enabled care services

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Alison Turner blogs about a new telehealth toolkit from the NHS Commissioning Assembly, which provides a range of resources including checklists, case studies and links to the evidence base.

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Decisions about new health technologies must be evidence-based, says commentary

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While this commentary is based on Canadian experiences, the authors do look at examples of health technology assessments elsewhere, applying the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) as the gold standard for others to follow. Health technology assessments are “an evidence-based policy tool that helps inform decision-making on how to balance demand and [read the full story…]

Access to IT for people with learning disabilities in the USA is no better than in the 1990s

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The use of information technology (IT) is now a fundamental part of education. An earlier study of the use of IT by students with learning disabilities in the USA (Wehmeyer et al 2004) found that they were less likely to have access to and benefit from technology than their non disabled peers. This USA survey [read the full story…]

Multimedia programme provides learning around HIV/AIDS for women with learning disabilities

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There have been a number of initiatives in recent years to improve the quality of information available for people with learning disabilities regarding sexual health. The researchers in this study were interested in looking at interventions specifically designed for people with mild to moderate learning disabilities. They were specifically interested on the impact of a [read the full story…]