Simon Bradstreet

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Simon is a Lecturer in Digital Health Interventions at the University of Glasgowโ€™s Institute of Health and Wellbeing. He has research interests in digital interventions, psychosis, recovery, self-management and peer support.

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Developing engaging online interventions for people with psychosis

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Simon Bradstreet explores a recent Australia study, which looks at individual- and intervention-level engagement with online interventions for people with psychosis, and discovers some of the things that can predict engagement with online psychosocial support.

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Hope for recovery: REFOCUS-PULSAR recovery training in specialist mental health care

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Simon Bradstreet welcomes the positive findings of the REFOCUS-PULSAR trial, which evaluated recovery-oriented practice training in specialist mental health care.

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Systematic review of recovery may leave more questions than answers

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Simon Bradstreet is left feeling frustrated by this systematic review of person-oriented recovery in people living with severe mental illness, which neglected to include a significant amount of relevant research.

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The long view: what has really changed with recovery?

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Simon Bradstreet explores a recent qualitative study looking at 20 years in the lives of a group of 20 people with psychosis in Ireland. The research provides evidence on the pros and cons of the adoption of recovery-based approaches from people who are uniquely placed to provide a long-term view.

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Recovery review highlights rhetoric-evidence gap: does that CHIME with you?

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Simon Bradsheet publishes his debut elf blog on a recent review of mental health recovery, which provides a useful wake-up call to recovery enthusiasts and researchers to more fully take account of a broader set of experiences when justifying the application of recovery values.

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