Can SMS text messages help prevent relapse in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder?

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A group of UCL Mental Health MSc students summarise a recent pilot study, which explores the acceptability and feasibility of the Texting for Relapse Prevention (T4RP) programme for people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

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Mental health apps: using implementation science to understand sustained use

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Bethany Gill summarises a recent narrative review of mental health apps for depression and anxiety, which explores what’s needed to make sure apps are successfully implemented and used sustainably.

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What content is found in the mental health apps that people are actually using?

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In his debut blog, Stephen Schueller critiques a study of ‘user-adjusted’ analyses, which aims to describe the content of mental health apps that are actually reaching people.

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Is it feasible to use apps to support people with first episode psychosis?

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In her debut blog, Rosa Pitts summarises the ARIES trial, which suggests it may be feasible to use a smartphone app (My Journey 3) to help prevent relapse in psychosis, although questions remain about long-term participant engagement with the app.

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Problematic smartphone use: what are the consequences for teens and their screens?

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Lucinda Powell explores a recent systematic review and meta-analysis which finds that problematic smartphone use in young people is associated with poorer mental health.

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MyFitnessPal: how people with eating disorders use the diet and exercise app

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Georgie Parker reviews a qualitative analysis of Reddit comments relating to the use of MyFitnessPal and its impact on eating disorder behaviours.

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Therapy over the telephone: how does it compare to face-to-face? The answer might surprise you…

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Imogen Bell blogs a timely systematic review which compares the interactional qualities of psychological therapy delivered face-to-face and over the telephone.

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Exploring drop-out rates: new review shows poor retention in trials of apps for depression

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In his debut blog, Tom Steare summarises a systematic review looking at drop out rates in randomised controlled trials of smartphone apps for depression, which finds that depression apps with mood monitoring and human feedback were associated with greater retention of research participants.

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The science of suicide prevention: Innovative technologies and ethical implications #IASP2019

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Tiago Zortea and Karen Wetherall help us prepare for the 30th World Congress of the International Association for Suicide Prevention #IASP2019, which is taking place in Derry this week. This blog summarises what we know about the potential for digital technologies (smartphones, machine learning and virtual reality) to help improve suicide prevention.

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Screen time: Is it linked to intake of cariogenic food in children?

Polls regularly highlight 'growing fears' about children being bullied on the internet.

This review of the association between screen-time behaviour and diet, including a potentially cariogenic diet, in children younger than 12 years old includes 19 cross-sectional studies. All of the included studies suggest a relationship.

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