SlowMo: an app to improve thinking biases in people experiencing paranoia

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Imogen Bell blogs about a recent randomised controlled trial of the SlowMo app, which aimed to slow down thinking patterns and correct interpretation biases in people experiencing paranoia.

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Parenting in the smartphone age: there may be technoference on the picture #CAMHScampfire

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Douglas Badenoch helps us prepare for another CAMHS Around the Campfire session by tuning into the real effect of smartphone use on parenting; a multiverse analysis carried out by Kathryn L. Modecki and colleagues from Griffith University in Queensland, Australia.

Follow #CAMHScampfire on Twitter at 9.30am BST on Wednesday 23rd June for an online journal club discussing this paper. Or sign up now to join the free webinar hosted by ACAMH.

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Can SMS text messages help prevent relapse in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder?

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A group of UCL Mental Health MSc students summarise a recent pilot study, which explores the acceptability and feasibility of the Texting for Relapse Prevention (T4RP) programme for people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

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Mental health apps: using implementation science to understand sustained use

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Bethany Gill summarises a recent narrative review of mental health apps for depression and anxiety, which explores what’s needed to make sure apps are successfully implemented and used sustainably.

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What content is found in the mental health apps that people are actually using?

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In his debut blog, Stephen Schueller critiques a study of ‘user-adjusted’ analyses, which aims to describe the content of mental health apps that are actually reaching people.

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Is it feasible to use apps to support people with first episode psychosis?

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In her debut blog, Rosa Pitts summarises the ARIES trial, which suggests it may be feasible to use a smartphone app (My Journey 3) to help prevent relapse in psychosis, although questions remain about long-term participant engagement with the app.

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Problematic smartphone use: what are the consequences for teens and their screens?

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Lucinda Powell explores a recent systematic review and meta-analysis which finds that problematic smartphone use in young people is associated with poorer mental health.

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MyFitnessPal: how people with eating disorders use the diet and exercise app

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Georgie Parker reviews a qualitative analysis of Reddit comments relating to the use of MyFitnessPal and its impact on eating disorder behaviours.

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Therapy over the telephone: how does it compare to face-to-face? The answer might surprise you…

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Imogen Bell blogs a timely systematic review which compares the interactional qualities of psychological therapy delivered face-to-face and over the telephone.

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Exploring drop-out rates: new review shows poor retention in trials of apps for depression

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In his debut blog, Tom Steare summarises a systematic review looking at drop out rates in randomised controlled trials of smartphone apps for depression, which finds that depression apps with mood monitoring and human feedback were associated with greater retention of research participants.

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