‘Did not attend’: what are the barriers to attending initial psychotherapy appointments?

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Laurence Palfreyman explores a mixed methods systematic review, which brings together research from across the world looking at why people fail to attend their first psychotherapy appointment.

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Disordered eating during COVID: understanding experiences from Reddit posts

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Georgie Parker summarises a research study of Reddit comments posted during Covid-19, which looks at how the pandemic and lockdown affected people with disordered eating behaviours.

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When is the best time for a person with dementia to move to a care home?

There are more than 400,000 older people living in care homes in the United Kingdom (UK) and around 80% of those people are likely to have dementia (SCIE, 2020). Care homes can be funded by the local authority, the National Health Service (NHS) or privately: it is estimated that around 40% of residents in care [read the full story…]

Racism, vicarious racism and mental health: how can we support those affected?

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Liesbeth Tip, Jingni Ma and Christina McClure review a recent cross-sectional study exploring vicarious racism, vigilance and mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic. They present their own personal accounts of racist attacks, their reflections about the usefulness of bystander interventions, and their determination to work together to help people feel safer and more included in society.

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Inequalities in accessing dementia care and support during COVID-19

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Catherine Talbot reviews a recent qualitative study on accessing post-diagnostic dementia care before and since COVID-19, which highlights the need to reduce inequalities in dementia care.

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COVID-19: Casting forward the shadow

For various reasons, including cultural and socioeconomic factors, parents of children with intellectual disability have been shown to be at a greater risk of developing psychological disorders. In this study, Baker et al. investigate the well-being of caregivers in that context.

While turning on the TV or radio to hear about other countries’ COVID-19 experiences is likely to be more of a home rather than work activity, there is also some value in thinking about this professionally. Fortunately, some people have done lots of the heavy lifting for us, by working collaboratively to share their thinking. [read the full story…]

Supporting frontline health and social care workers during COVID-19: experiences of mental health professionals

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Laura Culshaw reviews a recent qualitative study on the experiences of mental health professionals supporting frontline health and social care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Living with mental health problems during COVID-19: how does it feel?

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In her debut blog, Anjana Greedharee reviews a co-produced, participatory qualitative study on the experiences of living with mental health problems 
during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK.

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Suicide rates in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic: cross-national data provide no evidence of an increase

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Karel Kieslich, Rosalind McAlpine and Alexandra Pitman review a recent study exploring suicide trends in the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic with real-time data from 21 countries.

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PTSD, anxiety and depression in UK frontline health care workers during COVID-19

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In his debut blog, Will Kapurura summarises a paper that explores the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health of healthcare workers in the UK during the early part of the 2020 pandemic.

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