Young offenders with developmental language disorder were twice as likely to reoffend after 12 months

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Douglas Badenoch summarises a prospective cohort study, which looked at whether a developmental language disorder in first time young offenders is associated with a higher rate of reoffending, independently from other known causes.

Follow #CAMHScampfire on Twitter at 5pm GMT on Monday 1st March for an online journal club discussing this paper.

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How has the COVID-19 lockdown affected our mental health?

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Marco Solmi and Samuele Cortese review a recent longitudinal study exploring the trajectories of anxiety and depression during the COVID-19 lockdown in England.

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Dementia ward inpatients need better protection from COVID-19

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Clarissa Giebel summarises a recent study on the prevalence, management, and outcomes of COVID-19 infections in older people and dementia patients on mental health wards.

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Suicide risk in young people who self-harm and visit emergency departments

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Katerina Kavalidou reviews a prospective observational cohort study on mortality and suicide risk in young people after they present to hospital emergency departments following episodes of self-harm.

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Survivors of genocide more likely to develop dementia, according to new Israeli study

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Anna Sri explores a recent Israeli study which suggests that people exposed to genocide are more likely to develop dementia, even when a range of confounders are accounted for.

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Quarantine: infection prevention, but at what cost for mental health?

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As the COVID-19 lockdown enters its second week in the UK, Matthew Iveson and Andrew McIntosh consider the psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it.

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A little praise goes a long way, but too much may be harmful

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Asha Patel and Sal McKeown summarise a Dutch observational study of parents’ praise and children’s self-esteem. The research finds that parents’ inflated praise predicted lower self-esteem in children, and also predicted higher narcissism, but only in children with high self-esteem.

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Are antidepressants safe? A new umbrella review of observational studies suggests they are, but we need more accurate data

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Andrea Cipriani and Anneka Tomlinson scrutinise a brand new umbrella review of the associations between antidepressants and adverse health outcomes, which suggests that antidepressants are safe for most people who experience mental health difficulties.

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Persistent and severe postnatal depression predicts adverse outcomes in children

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Sophie Graham and Jennifer Burgess explore the associations between persistent and severe postnatal depression in mothers and mental health and educational outcomes in their offspring.

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Traumatic brain injury increases the long-term risk of dementia #DAW18

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Eleanor Kennedy summarises a Danish observational cohort study, which looks at the long-term risk of dementia among people with traumatic brain injury.

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