Telemental health: mega-blog on remote mental health care during the pandemic

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In her debut blog, Philippa Clery presents the findings of three studies from the NIHR Mental Health Policy Research Unit, which explore the acceptability and efficacy of telemental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Money talks: stakeholder perspectives on the design of a combined money and mental health intervention

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In her debut blog, Annie Irvine summarises a qualitative study which explores service user and staff views of a combined money advice and psychological therapy service within IAPT.

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DBT for BPD: how can benefits be maintained long-term?

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Dafni Katsampa and Francesca Payne summarise a qualitative study from the Republic of Ireland, which explores the long-term benefits of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for people diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD).

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When is the best time for a person with dementia to move to a care home?

There are more than 400,000 older people living in care homes in the United Kingdom (UK) and around 80% of those people are likely to have dementia (SCIE, 2020). Care homes can be funded by the local authority, the National Health Service (NHS) or privately: it is estimated that around 40% of residents in care [read the full story…]

Self-Funders in England: How much choice and control do they really have?

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Self-funders (or elf-funders) are people who have to pay for their social care using their own finances, as opposed to receiving partial or full funding from their local council’s adult social care department. In England a threshold exists of £23,250, those who have above this amount in savings and sometimes other assets are deemed to [read the full story…]

Enhancing primary care support for informal carers

An informal carer refers to someone who, “provides unpaid help and support to a partner, child, relative, friend or neighbour who could not manage without this help” (Beesley, 2006). Comparatively, people who choose to be carers have a higher quality of life than those who provide care as it is expected of them. Though health [read the full story…]

Psychosis: the ups and downs of social relationships

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KCL student Zephyr Percy reviews a recent qualitative study exploring the positive and negative impact of social relationships for people with experience of psychosis.

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Why CBT can fail those with OCD: service users’ perspectives

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In his debut blog, Lawson Taylor summarises a preprint qualitative study that explores the views of service users with OCD or panic disorder, and tries to offer some answers as to why CBT does not work well for some people.

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Implementing guidelines to protect long-term care facilities

Fail-Safe N versus Trim and Fill: choose your bias measure wisely. It could have a major impact on your results.

COVID-19 has brought unprecedented challenges across all levels of society, but older people have undoubtedly been at the highest risk from this disease, particularly those living in long-term care facilities. As in many countries, the Chilean government has produced guidelines and regulations to encourage the prevention and control of COVID-19 outbreaks in residential and nursing [read the full story…]

Asylum seekers are penalised for inconsistent narratives: what can we learn from frontline professionals?

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Lucy Purnell reviews a qualitative study which suggests that the applications of asylum seekers should not be rejected on the basis that there are inconsistencies between interviews.

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