Vishal Bhavsar

Profile photo of Vishal Bhavsar
Vishal is a psychiatrist with an MSc in research methods. He is currently a Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Training Fellow in Epidemiology at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. He is also Module Co-Leader of the Research Methods Ethics and Statistics part of the MSc in Psychiatric Research. His PhD research is on the role of violent victimisation in both childhood and adulthood on being diagnosed with psychotic illness, and whether it is affected by the kind of neighbourhood you live in.

Website

Follow me here –

Suicide in prisons: prevalence and contributing factors in high-income countries

Women are only 5% of the prison population, yet they represent 25% of the forensic health population

Vishal Bhavsar explores a brand new ecological study of 24 high-income countries that investigates the prevalence and contributory factors relating to suicide in prisons.

[read the full story...]

Street triage: all it’s cooked up to be?

21501244171_f780ee3a94_k

Vishal Bhavsar appraises a descriptive study of Street Triage and detentions under Section 136 Mental Health Act in the North-East of England.

[read the full story...]

Extremism and mental health: is there a link?

12852539_94cf73f48d_o

Vishal Bhavsar considers the findings of a cross sectional survey of over 3,500 men, which measured the prevalence of extremist attitudes in the general population and any associations with mental illness.

[read the full story...]

People with severe mental illness are more likely to be victims of violent and non-violent crime

shutterstock_74403016

Vishal Bhavsar summarises a recent cross-sectional study of violent and non-violent crime against adults with severe mental illness, which finds that service users were five times more likely to be victims of assault, and three times more likely to be victims of household acquisitive crime.

[read the full story...]

Schizophrenia and violent crime: perpetrators or victims?

shutterstock_222952348

Debut blogger Vishal Bhavsar summarises an Israeli population-based study that explores the links between schizophrenia and violent crime. He calls on researchers to focus on people with schizophrenia as victims rather than perpetrators of crime.

[read the full story...]