Derek Richards

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Derek Richards is the Director of the Centre for Evidence-based Dentistry, Editor of the Evidence-based Dentistry Journal, Consultant in Dental Public Health with Forth Valley Health Board and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Dundee & Glasgow Dental Schools. He helped to establish both the Centre for Evidence-based Dentistry and the Evidence-based Dentistry Journal. He has been involved with teaching EBD and a wide range of evidence-based initiatives both nationally and internationally since 1994.

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Herbal mouthwashes: Are they a useful oral hygiene adjunct?

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This review of the the effect of herbal mouthwashes as an adjuvant to oral hygiene measures in reducing plaque and gingival inflammation in adults included 20 RCTs suggesting that most agents performed better than placebo.

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Sugar-free chewing gum – does it reduce caries?

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This review of the effect of sugar-free chewing gum(SFG) on dental caries included 12 studies 11 of which were RCTs. None of the included studies was at low risk of bias and ther findings suggest there is evidence to support the use of SFG in the control of dental caries in children.

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Alveolar ridge preservation: which grafting material?

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This review of grafting materials for alveolar ridge preservation included 38 small RCTs. 34 different materials were investigated with the findings suggesting that no grafting material increased new bone formation between 3 and 6 months after tooth extraction.

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Caries prevention in children: The RECUR trial

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This multi-centre RCTs of a single dental nurse delivered ‘talking’ intervention informed by motivational interviewing approaches was successful in reducing new caries experience in a group of high risk children at 2 years.

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Cracked teeth: outcomes from endodontic treatment

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This review of outcomes following rooth canal treatment in cracked teeth included 4 small retrospective cohort studies which suggested an overall survival of 84.1% at 60 months.

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Endodontic treatment for compromised first permanent molars.

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This review of the clinical success rates of endodontic therapies used on compromised first permanent molar teeth in a child aged 16 and under included 11 studies. While good success rates are suggested for pulpotomy the limited evidence means definative conclusions cannot be drawn.

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Halitosis: What are the best methods of prevention and control?

According to this review, Venlafaxine, Pregabalin, Escitalopram, and Duloxetine are viable alternatives to traditional drug treatment for generalised anxiety disorder.

44 RCTs were included in this Cochrane review assessing interventions for the prevention and control of halitosis. Only low to very-low cetrainty evidence was identified so conclusions regarding the superiority of any intervention could not be drawn.

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Periodontal treatment to prevent or manage cardiovascular disease

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Two small RCTs at high risk of bias were included in this Cochrane systematic review looking at the effects of periodontal therapy for primary or secondary prevention of CVD in people with chronic periodontitis.

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Resin-retained bridges and oral health related quality of life

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3 small studies of limited quality were included in this review of changes in oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) after tooth replacement with resin-retained bridges. While the findings suggest significant improvement in OHRQoL the findings should be interpreted cautiously.

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Caries management in children. The FiCTION trial

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The FiCTION trail compared 3 caries management strategies for dentinal caries in primary teeth finding no evidence of a difference between the approaches. This emphasises the importance of primary prevention of caries to avoid dental caries althogther.

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