Future self-harm may be reduced with a brief psychological intervention, but perhaps only for the more severe

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Angharad de Cates explores a recent RCT of a brief psychological intervention to reduce repetition of self-harm in patients admitted to hospital following a suicide attempt.

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Alcohol brief interventions: how can content, provider and setting reduce alcohol consumption?

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Olivia Maynard considers the findings of a recent systematic review that evaluates the effectiveness of alcohol brief interventions in reducing consumption. The review focuses specifically on the impact of the intervention content, provider group and setting.

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Searching for solutions: a new brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in acute psychiatric inpatients

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Ian Hamilton presents the findings of a recent pilot randomised trial of a brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in psychiatric inpatient settings.

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Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

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Sally Adams summarises a meta-analysis of specialty substance use disorder services following brief alcohol intervention, which finds a lack of evidence for SBIRTs despite the widespread public health support for this type of programme.

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Psychosocial therapy effective in reducing self-harm, suicide and all-cause death

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Elly O’Brien summarises a large Danish cohort study, which investigates the short-term and long-term effects of psychosocial therapy for people after deliberate self-harm.

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Reducing alcohol consumption in illicit drug users: new Cochrane review on psychotherapies

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Olivia Maynard reports on a recent Cochrane review that investigates talking therapies for reducing alcohol consumption in illicit drug users. The reviewers found no differences in the effectiveness of different psychotherapies (motivational interviewing, brief interventions, CBT) and insufficient evidence to draw any meaningful conclusions.

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Brief interventions for substance misuse in primary care

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Claire Mokrysz reports on two RCTs in JAMA that find no superiority over control for brief interventions for substance misuse in primary care. A finding that casts some doubt on interventions such as motivational interviewing for unhealthy drug use in primary care patients.

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