The COVID-19 pandemic is harming our mental health, and it’s affecting some more than others

When interpreting the results from this study, the recruitment method and representativeness of the sample need to be considered.

In his debut blog, Christian Dalton-Locke reviews a recent longitudinal (online survey) study, which looks at mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research finds that women, young adults, those from socially disadvantaged backgrounds, and people with pre-existing mental health problems were affected worse than others.

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Online sharing of self-harm–related images amongst young people: a cause for concern?

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In her debut blog, Prianka Padmanathan summarises a recent systematic review on the impact of online sharing and viewing of self-harm–related videos and photographs among young people.

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Disclosing self-harm history: people’s attributes and risk factors

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Holly Crudgington reviews a recent study from Manchester, which explores characteristics and risk of repetition in people who fail to report previous hospital presentations for self-harm.

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Risk factors for suicide in prison

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In her debut blog, Alice Dawson summarises an updated systematic review on risk factors for suicide in prison. The strongest risk factors identified were suicidal ideation, previous suicide attempt, history of self-harm, single-cell occupancy, and current psychiatric diagnosis.

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Psychotherapies for suicide and self-harm in young people: join our tweet chat #YouthSuicidePrevention

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Laura Hemming summarises a review on the comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for self-harm and suicide in young people, which highlights continued uncertainty in the field.

Join our tweet chat at 9am BST on Monday 24th May to discuss the future of #YouthSuicidePrevention research!

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Can we teach schools how to improve care for young people who self-harm? #CAMHScampfire

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Douglas Badenoch appraises and summarises a recent systematic review of experimental studies, which looks at whether school staff training can improve responses to pupils who self-harm.

Follow #CAMHScampfire on Twitter at 5pm BST on Monday 26th April for an online journal club discussing this paper. Or sign up now to join the free webinar hosted by ACAMH.

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Mental health difficulties commonly reported by ICU staff during the pandemic

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Nada Seif reviews a recent survey study on self-reported mental health problems in ICU staff working during the UK 2020 COVID-19 pandemic.

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Communicating emotions and reducing harm amongst male prisoners

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Rebecca Crook reviews a recent qualitative study exploring the difficulties that male prisoners sometimes have in identifying and discussing their feelings about suicide and violence.

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Can brain scans help reduce the guilt and shame associated with adolescent self-harm?

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Rachel Symons summarises a recent study, which shows that poor connectivity between brain regions may be an indicator of non-suicidal self-injury in young people.

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Blue Whale Challenge and suicide contagion

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Holly Crudgington reviews a qualitative study that examines the self-harm and suicide contagion effects of the Blue Whale Challenge on YouTube and Twitter.

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