Right People, Right Questions: new survey on young people’s mental health #youngpeopleMHQ

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Today we are announcing a major new survey that will help prioritise research questions for young people’s mental health over the coming years. The Right People, Right Questions project is about looking for your unanswered questions on young people’s mental health that can be answered by research. We want to hear from 11-25 year olds with experience of mental health issues, their parents or carers, if you work with young people, or if you have another interest in the mental health of young people.

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Making research findings available: join the More Open Access Pledge

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Eva Alisic from the Global Young Academy presents a new pledge that researchers are invited to make to increase open access publications.

The More Open Access Pledge is endorsed by us elves, so please sign up now if you can!

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Is clinical research essential to develop good mental health apps?

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Join a diverse group of mental health service users, researchers, practitioners and developers to discuss this vital issue. We are debating this question in a #Mindtech15 fringe event taking place in London (and on Twitter) at 7pm on Wednesday 2nd December.

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New ways to engage with research evidence: 6 top tips for #NPNR2015

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André Tomlin presents his 6 top tips for engaging with research evidence, taken from his #NPNR15 talk at the 21st International Network for Psychiatric Nursing Research conference taking place in Manchester on 17-18 September 2015.

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How do policy makers use research evidence?

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Mike Clark, a man who’s in the business of research and evidence based practice, looks at an Australian study about policy makers’ use of research evidence. He discovers what some of the cultural and practical barriers are and thinks about the UK context.

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Settle down by the fire while Professor Martin Knapp tells the Social Care Elf Nativity Story

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Are you sitting comfortably by the fire, with a glass of sherry (or preferred beverage) and a mince pie? Good! Because Professor Martin Knapp is about to tell the story of the Social Care Elf Nativity.

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Health policy decisions are based on experiences rather than high-quality research, according to survey

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Introduction People living with chronic disease often have a poor quality of life, and, for the NHS, it results in a significant cost and resource burden, with people facing years of treatment. It makes sense therefore to make sure that health services are run as efficiently as possible, while maintaining or improving levels of quality. [read the full story…]