Coercion and power in psychiatry #MHQT

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Ian Cummins explores a Belgian qualitative study looking at the experiences of people who have been subject to compulsory mental health legislation and admitted to hospital against their will.

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Compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act: significantly more likely if you come from a BAME or migrant group

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Ian Cummins explores a recent international systematic review and meta-analysis, which highlights ethnic variations in compulsory detention under the Mental Health Act.

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The impact of racism on mental health

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Alison Faulkner considers a recent report on racism and mental health by the Synergi Collaborative Centre, which covers the impact of interpersonal racism, the multidimensional nature of disadvantage, structural disadvantage and mental illness, and pathways to mental health care.

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Involuntary hospitalisation: variations in mental health detentions across Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand

The rate of mental health detentions in England has risen by nearly 50% in the last decade. This is faster than almost anywhere else in Europe

John Baker examines an international comparative mental health study published today, which looks at variations in patterns of involuntary hospitalisation and in legal frameworks.

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Mental Health Act review: the demise of the nearest relative?

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Kathryn Berzins considers the implications of a recent rapid systematic review of the views and experiences of the Nearest Relative provision of the Mental Health Act (1983).

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Mental Health Act detentions are increasing, but why?

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Luke Sheridan-Rains summarises a study containing data on the use of the Mental Health Act in England over the last 30 years, which points to an inexorable rise in involuntary admissions.

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Black patients’ first contact with mental health services is more likely to be coercive

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It is well documented that there are differences in how patients are treated, depending on their ethnicity. Previous inquiries in the UK have suggested that the NHS is institutionally racist (Blofeld et al, 2003). Some groups, for example those from African Caribbean or Aboriginal descent, experience more coercive care and poor outcomes, including higher doses of [read the full story…]