Ian Cummins

Ian Cummins
Ian is Senior Lecturer in Social Work at the University of Salford. Before taking up an academic post, Ian Cummins worked as a probation officer and subsequently an approved social worker in Manchester for over ten years and is a registered social worker. He has acted as a reviewer for the Routledge Criminology, British Journal of Social Work, Journal of Social Work Education, International Journal of Social Work, Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology, Journal of Academy of Social Science and the Journal of Adult Protection and Transgressive Culture. He has acted as a reviewer of research bids for the National Institute for Health Research Central Commissioning Facility and is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Adult Protection. The main themes of his research are policing and mental illness in the era of mass incarceration and the cultural representation of policing.

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Home eviction and health inequalities

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Ian Cummins considers a recent systematic review on the threat of home eviction and its effects on health through the equity lens.

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Job clubs may protect unemployed people from depression

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Ian Cummins explores a recent systematic review of interventions to reduce the impact of unemployment and economic hardship on mental health in the general population.

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Mental health of prisoners: have we reached a state of crisis?

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Ian Cummins highlights the increased risk of all-cause mortality, suicide, self-harm, violence and victimisation in prisoners. He welcomes a recent review of reviews which contains clinical, policy and research recommendations.

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Austerity and suicide: are we placing health before wealth?

Protesters clash with policemen during riots at a May Day rally in Athens May 1, 2010. Angry protesters set fire to garbage cans and two TV outside broadcast vans in Athens as thousands of Greeks marched through the capital on May Day to protest against austerity measures they say only hurt the poor.  REUTERS/Icon/Panagiotis Tzamaros  (GREECE - Tags: POLITICS BUSINESS CIVIL UNREST EMPLOYMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY) GREECE OUT. NO COMMERCIAL OR EDITORIAL SALES IN GREECE

Ian Cummins reflects on a recent study looking at the relationship between fiscal austerity and suicide rates in Greece, Italy, Ireland, Portugal and Spain.

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Community treatment orders and personalisation: an unresolvable paradox?

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Ian Cummins explores new research about community treatment orders and the paradox of personalisation under compulsion.

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Work Capability Assessments linked with increase in suicides

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Ian Cummins considers the findings of a recent longitudinal study that measures the impact that welfare reform and disability assessments have had on mental illness and rates of suicide.

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Social participation interventions for mental health: do they work?

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In this blog, Ian Cummins looks at a study, which seeks to examine the effectiveness of particular forms of intervention that focus on social participation for adults with mental health problems.

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Common mental health disorders linked with increased risk of violent reoffending in ex-prisoners

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Ian Cummins considers the implications of a new cohort study of convicted prisoners in Sweden, which links psychiatric disorders with violent reoffending.

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Social work, prevention and multiple exclusion homelessness

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Ian Cummins examines research on multiple exclusion homelessness and finds that social work may have an important role for prevention.

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Multiple perspectives on community treatment orders

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In his second blog on community treatment orders, Ian Cummins looks at a UK study on user, carer and practitioner perspectives and critiques the policy.

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