Douglas Badenoch

Profile photo of Douglas Badenoch
I am an information scientist with an interest in making knowledge from systematic research more accessible to people who need it. This means you. I've been attempting this in the area of Evidence-Based Health Care since 1995. So far the results have been mixed. For some reason we expected busy clinicians to search databases and appraise papers instead of seeing patients. We also expected publishers to make the research freely available to the people who paid for it.. Ha! Hence The National Elf service.

Website

Follow me here –

  • Badge_clarity

Mental health research: let us reason together #RCTdebate

5947344481_950bf7ec16_b

Amy Price and Douglas Badenoch respond to the McPin Foundation talking point paper written by Alison Faulkner entitled ‘Randomised controlled trials: The straitjacket of mental health research?’

[read the full story...]

Say hello to the people behind the National Elf Service

shutterstock_272563622

Andre Tomlin and Douglas Badenoch tell us a little more about their background in evidence-based healthcare and their work at Minervation in Oxford.

[read the full story...]

Coping with the avalanche of evidence-based mental health research

shutterstock_160037813

Douglas Badenoch and André Tomlin present the results of their own literature review and information science study, which investigates the challenges facing anyone trying to keep up to date with reliable research. They explain how their work mobilizing a community of research-savvy bloggers, is breaking down these barriers and opening up new avenues for disseminating the best available evidence to those who need it.

[read the full story...]

Cannabis use in young people linked with lower high school completion and degree attainment

shutterstock_97598912-150x150

André Tomlin and Douglas Badenoch voice a note of caution about the Lancet Psychiatry meta-analysis of cannabis use in young people. The study links cannabis use in children with low educational attainment, cannabis dependence, illicit drug use and suicide attempts in later life.

[read the full story...]

Pilot study suggests that CBT may be a viable alternative to antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia, or does it?

shutterstock_126814478

People with schizophrenia stop taking their antipsychotics for a wide range of reasons (e.g. debilitating side effects or a belief that they will not help them), but when they do health professionals often find it extremely difficult to care for these patients, because the alternative treatment options available to them are very limited. Of course, [read the full story…]

Digital innovation works best when users are involved at every stage

shutterstock_106935899

Digital mental health is thriving in 2013 and we are thrilled to be part of the growing community with our Mental Elf website and app. We have had time to reflect on the development of the Mental Elf website recently, as André was interviewed by Hannah Nicklin from Hide and Seek who had been asked to [read the full story…]

CBT may prevent depression in at-risk children whose parents have a history of depression

shutterstock_89728426

The harmful impact of depression extends far beyond the individual sufferer to caregivers, friends and family members.  Children of people with depression are more likely to suffer from depression themselves.  This may be due to both inherited and environmental factors. This new randomised controlled trial (RCT), published earlier this week in JAMA Psychiatry, set out [read the full story…]

More evidence needed on additional interventions to reduce mortality in older people with depression

Older man

It has consistently been shown that a link exists between older adults who have depression and mortality (Cuijpers & Smit, 2002, Schulz et al., 2002). RCTs have demonstrated that treating depression during later life in primary care settings can result in the remission of depression and its associated symptoms as well as improve quality of [read the full story…]

Systematic review exposes the lack of evidence for psychosocial interventions in patients with head and neck cancer

The Dental Elf

Today we feature a blog from our good friend, The Dental Elf, whose remit includes Head and Neck cancers. The psychological impacts of such cancers can be devastating, so we were interested to see a systematic review looking at the impact of psychosocial interventions on anxiety, depression and quality of life. Unfortunately, the bottom line [read the full story…]