Antidepressant withdrawal: reviewing the paper behind the headlines

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Joseph Hayes and Sameer Jauhar set the record straight on antidepressant withdrawal. They show how the recent review by Davies and Read is seriously flawed and does not accurately portray the data. They conclude that we urgently need clearer evidence on the incidence, severity and duration of any symptoms related to antidepressant withdrawal.

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Battle of the meta-analyses: is CBT becoming less effective over time?

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Suzanne Dash explores a recent meta-analysis that looks again at RCTs of cognitive behavioural therapy for depression, to ascertain whether or not the effects of CBT are systematically falling over time.

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Antipsychotic efficacy measured by real-world observational study

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Tracey Roberts examines whether a retrospective observational study accurately investigates the effectiveness of second and first generation antipsychotics.

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In praise of little: sponsorship bias in depression research

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Samei Huda welcomes a new meta-analysis of sponsorship bias in the comparative efficacy of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for adult depression.

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CBT for Autism Spectrum Disorders and comorbid mental illness

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Alix Dixon presents a recent systematic review on the effectiveness of CBT for autism spectrum disorders and comorbid anxiety or depression.

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Acupuncture for mild cognitive impairment: rubbish in, rubbish out

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Edzard Ernst shines a light on the unfounded claims presented in a meta-analysis published today on acupuncture for amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

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Is the NICE guideline for bipolar disorder biased in favour of psychosocial interventions?

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Guy Goodwin reviews a new paper in the Lancet Psychiatry by Jauhar, McKenna and Laws, that calls into question the trustworthiness of the NICE bipolar disorder guidance.

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The PACE Trial for chronic fatigue syndrome: choppy seas but a prosperous voyage

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Simon Wessely responds to the huge amount of recent criticism that has surrounded the publication of a follow-up paper of the PACE trial into chronic fatigue syndrome. This extended blog presents the PACE trial and its main results, but also reminds us what makes a good RCT, as well as exploring how well PACE measures up.

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Antidepressant meta-analyses: big business and bias

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Alex Langford reflects on the findings of a recent study that looks at 185 meta-analyses of antidepressants. It finds that industry involvement in research can lead to biased studies that under-report negative aspects of antidepressants for depression.

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Mental health research: let us reason together #RCTdebate

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Amy Price and Douglas Badenoch respond to the McPin Foundation talking point paper written by Alison Faulkner entitled ‘Randomised controlled trials: The straitjacket of mental health research?’

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