Psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis

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Rachel Upthegrove reviews a new systematic review and meta-analysis of psychological and psychosocial interventions for negative symptoms in psychosis.

This is the third in a new series of Mental Elf blogs produced in partnership with the British Journal of Psychiatry.

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Exploring the mental health charity sector evidence system

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A guest post from Caroline Fiennes, Director of Giving Evidence, who has today published a new report that explores in the ways in which UK mental health charities use evidence in the development of their services.

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Is the NICE guideline for bipolar disorder biased in favour of psychosocial interventions?

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Guy Goodwin reviews a new paper in the Lancet Psychiatry by Jauhar, McKenna and Laws, that calls into question the trustworthiness of the NICE bipolar disorder guidance.

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Faith based CBT for depression and anxiety: review highlights a lack of good quality evidence

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Alan Underwood considers a new systematic review and meta analysis, which highlights the lack of evidence for faith based CBT in treating people with depression or anxiety disorders.

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Psychotherapy for depression in older adults: promising results, but insufficient good quality research

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This recent meta-analysis confirms that psychotherapy has a moderate to high effect on depression in older adults. However, a note of caution is sounded because of publication bias and the low quality of several of the included studies.

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RCT shows CBT is more effective than psychoanalytic psychotherapy for treating bulimia nervosa, but that’s only half the story

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I had actually heard about this Danish study, published recently by Poulsen et al. (2014) in the American Journal of Psychiatry, before it landed in my inbox. The findings are interesting because they highlight the debate surrounding the comparative efficacy of psychological treatments. What is most striking though, is how the study itself challenges the [read the full story…]

Cochrane review says there’s insufficient evidence to tell whether fluoxetine is better or worse than other treatments for depression

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Depression is common in primary care and associated with a substantial personal, social and societal burden. There is considerable ongoing controversy regarding whether antidepressant pharmacotherapy works and, in particular, for whom. One widely-prescribed antidepressant is fluoxetine (Prozac), an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) class. Although a number of more recent antidepressants are [read the full story…]