CBT and severity of depression

NES-BJP-collab

Joe Hayes summarises a new meta-analysis in the British Journal of Psychiatry that shows how the initial severity of depression does not alter the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy.

This is the first in a new series of Mental Elf blogs produced in partnership with the British Journal of Psychiatry.

[read the full story...]

Self-guided iCBT for depression: effective but still not sticky enough

apple-1853337_1280

Stefan Rennick-Egglestone highlights a brand new IPD meta-analysis of self-guided Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of depression.

[read the full story...]

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy can prevent recurrent depression

702361266_359e089599_b

Sarah McDonald reports on a meta-analysis published yesterday, which found that when compared with active treatment, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy resulted in a reduced risk of depressive relapse.

This blog also features a podcast interview with the lead author of the research, Professor Willem Kuyken.

[read the full story...]

Long working hours are associated with increased alcohol use

shutterstock_136678757

Sally Adams summarises a new BMJ systematic review and meta-analysis of working hours and alcohol use, which finds a link between longer working hours and risky alcohol consumption.

[read the full story...]

Moderators of outcome in late-life depression: should we be prescribing antidepressants to older people?

shutterstock_95774764

Meta-analyses are an incredibly useful tool for synthesising evidence. However, such analyses typically use aggregate data, meaning the average scores or outcomes for treatment groups, which can cause problems if we’re trying to dig a little deeper into the question of ‘what works’ to answer ‘what works, and for whom?’ The ‘for whom?’ question is [read the full story…]