suicide

Suicide is the act of intentionally ending your life.

There are three levels of intervention in suicide; 1) universal 2) selective and 3) indicated.

Universal interventions target everyone in a defined population. They aim to increase awareness about suicide, remove barriers to care, promote help-seeking and encourage protective factors. Some examples of universal interventions include school-based interventions and national initiatives such as restricted access to lethal means. Evidence suggests that universal interventions are effective at increasing awareness and helping skills, though there is little evidence to suggest they’re effective at reducing suicide-related thoughts or behaviours.

Selective interventions address specific groups at increased risk for suicidal behaviours, for instance those with mental health problems or harmful use of substances. To date, there have been few studies into selective interventions and results are mixed.

Indicated interventions target high-risk individuals already displaying signs of suicidal behaviour. Examples include brief contact interventions (e.g. crisis cards) and talking therapies. Evidence suggests that brief contact interventions are effective for young people in clinical settings. A network meta-analysis conducted in 2021 found that the most effective talking therapies for suicide and self-harm in young people are dialectical behavioural therapies and mentalisation-based therapies.

 

Our suicide Blogs

Risk factors for LGBTQ+ youth self-harm and suicide

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In her debut blog, Hazel Marzetti reviews a recent systematic review and meta-analysis on victimisation and mental illness prevalence among LGBTQ+ young people with experiences of self-harm and suicide.

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The COVID-19 pandemic is harming our mental health, and it’s affecting some more than others

When interpreting the results from this study, the recruitment method and representativeness of the sample need to be considered.

In his debut blog, Christian Dalton-Locke reviews a recent longitudinal (online survey) study, which looks at mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. The research finds that women, young adults, those from socially disadvantaged backgrounds, and people with pre-existing mental health problems were affected worse than others.

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Online sharing of self-harm–related images amongst young people: a cause for concern?

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In her debut blog, Prianka Padmanathan summarises a recent systematic review on the impact of online sharing and viewing of self-harm–related videos and photographs among young people.

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Antidepressants for youth depression: Cochrane review confirms they should not be the first port of call

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Susannah Murphy summarises a new Cochrane review and network meta-analysis, which provides the best evidence to date about new generation antidepressants for depression in children and adolescents.

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Do suicide awareness campaigns reduce stigma and increase help-seeking?

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Cara Richardson reviews a Dutch study exploring the impact of a suicide prevention awareness campaign on stigma, taboo and attitudes towards professional help-seeking.

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Risk factors for suicide in prison

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In her debut blog, Alice Dawson summarises an updated systematic review on risk factors for suicide in prison. The strongest risk factors identified were suicidal ideation, previous suicide attempt, history of self-harm, single-cell occupancy, and current psychiatric diagnosis.

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Psychotherapies for suicide and self-harm in young people: join our tweet chat #YouthSuicidePrevention

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Laura Hemming summarises a review on the comparative efficacy and acceptability of psychotherapies for self-harm and suicide in young people, which highlights continued uncertainty in the field.

Join our tweet chat at 9am BST on Monday 24th May to discuss the future of #YouthSuicidePrevention research!

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Many men do seek help prior to suicide, but are services adequately designed to assess men’s needs?

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Cara Richardson summarises a qualitative photovoice study, which finds that some men who died by suicide did seek help before their death, but the help given was often ineffective.

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PTSD-related suicides can be prevented, but we have to act fast

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Nada Abou Seif summarises a recent Swedish cohort study of 3.1 million people, which looks at suicide risk in people with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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We can safely deliver therapy to suicidal inpatients, but we still don’t know if it works

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John Baker reviews a pilot randomised controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural suicide prevention therapy for mental health inpatients, which found that the therapy was acceptable and feasible to deliver.

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