Charlotte Huggett

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Charlotte is a Trainee Clinical Psychologist at The University of Manchester and Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust. She previously worked as a Trial Manager of a randomised-control trial 'CARMS' (Cognitive AppRoaches to coMbatting Suicidality), which was sponsored by the University of Manchester and hosted by Greater Manchester Mental Health NHS Trust. The trial aims to investigate the efficacy of a psychological therapy which aims to reduce suicidal thoughts, plans and behaviours for people who experience non-affective psychosis across 4 NHS trusts in the North West of England. Charlotte holds an MPhil in Clinical Psychology from the University of Manchester, where she examined the relationship between the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy and suicidal experiences.

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Staff views on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health services and service users #COVIDMentalHealth

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Charlotte Huggett reviews a recent mixed-methods study from the Mental Health Policy Research Unit, which explores mental health staff views on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health patients and services.

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Therapeutic alliance important to help people at risk of suicide

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Charlotte Huggett summarises a naturalistic outpatient study which explores the impact that therapeutic alliance and negative responses from clinicians can have on suicidal ideation in people in therapy.

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What influences mental health professionals to stigmatise people with schizophrenia?

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Charlotte Huggett explores a recent systematic review on schizophrenia stigma in mental health professionals and associated factors.

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Language matters: how should we talk about suicide?

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In her debut blog, Charlotte Huggett summarises a recent online survey which explored views on the language we should use to discuss suicide. The study concludes that the most acceptable phrases are currently: “attempted suicide”, “took their own life”, “died by suicide” and “ended their life”.

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