Non-medical use of prescription drugs #NonMedicalDrugs


Ian Hamilton and Julia Buxton from the University of York preview the #NonMedicalDrugs event that will take place in York on Friday 16th March 2018.

The meeting will bring together people who can offer personal and professional insights of the extent of the issue and how we can support people who develop problems.

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Chronic pain and depression: genetic and environmental risks


Marcus Munafo explores a recent study that uses genetic data and family environmental information to quantify the risk of chronic pain and the contribution of risk variants for major depressive disorder.

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Whiplash and neck pain: what’s most cost-effective?


GPs Tom Rowley and Michael Horsfield write their debut MSK Elf blog on a recent systematic review, which investigates the most cost-effective interventions for the management of whiplash-associated and neck pain-associated disorders.

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Will it hurt? Chronic pain and psychological functioning


Kirsten Lawson examines a recent meta-analysis of psychological functioning in people living with chronic pain. She discovers that anxiety is more common than depression in people with chronic pain and that practitioners should prioritise psychological functioning when caring for patients suffering from chronic pain.

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Salicylate-containing rubefacients for musculoskeletal pain in adults


Should you use or prescribe rubefacients (creams and lotions that irritate the skin) to relieve musculoskeletal pain? We report on a new Cochrane systematic review that focuses on salicylate-containing rubefacients for acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain.

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Cost-effectiveness of self-management for chronic pain in an aging population


Chronic pain is a major health concern, which increases in prevalence and impact with age. This is important as chronic pain can result in a significant decrease in function and quality of life along with an increase in use of health and social care. Self-management is a potentially inexpensive form of pain management and it [read the full story…]