Migrants with first episode psychosis are more likely to receive inpatient care, according to new Swedish population study

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In her debut blog, Natasha Chilman blogs about a Swedish cohort study of 1.3 million people, which finds that migrants with first episode psychosis are more likely to receive inpatient care.

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Healthcare contact prior to suicide: key opportunities for suicide prevention

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In her debut blog, Su-Gwan Tham explores a Welsh population-based data linkage study, which finds that almost 3 in 4 people (73%) who died by suicide in Wales had contact with services in the month before their death.

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Loneliness linked to mid-life depression: can tackling loneliness help prevent depression in older people?

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A group of students from the UCL MSc in Mental Health Studies summarise a study on the association between loneliness and depression among older adults.

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Migration and the increased risk of compulsory psychiatric admission for psychosis

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Zuva Dengu summarises a recent Swedish cohort study exploring migrant status and risk of compulsory admission at first diagnosis of psychotic disorder, which suggests that where you are from will influence your experience within psychiatric care.

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In harm’s way: psychiatric diagnosis and risks of being subjected to and perpetrating violence

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Sarah Steeg discusses a cohort study finding that people with a psychiatric diagnosis are 3-4 times more likely to be a victim or perpetrator of violence.

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Suicidality in India: findings from a national cross sectional study

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In her debut blog, Dee Knipe summarises a national cross-sectional study recently published in The Lancet Psychiatry, which found that more than 44 million adults in India could experience suicidality.

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Police killings and the mental health of black Americans

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Ian Cummins provides the context and perspective to consider the implications of a population-based, quasi-experimental study of police killings and their spillover effects on the mental health of black Americans.

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Eating disorders and suicide

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David Steele considers the implications of a Swedish population registry study, which finds that people with eating disorders and their close relations are at increased risk for attempting and/or completing suicide.

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Lower rates of cervical and breast screening found in Canadian population study

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Lower rates of cervical and breast cancer screening have been reported in women with learning disabilities when compared to the general population. The researchers in this Canadian Study set out to look at whether there were any differences in the rates of cervical and breast screening between women with learning disabilities and those without. As [read the full story…]