Alison Faulkner

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Alison Faulkner is a survivor researcher and trainer in mental health with over 25 years’ experience of working in mental health research and consultancy. She has worked for most of the major mental health charities, including the Mental Health Foundation, the Centre for Mental Health, NSUN (the National Survivor User Network), Mind, Rethink and Together for Mental Wellbeing. Alison has personal experience of using mental health services, including inpatient care, medication, psychotherapy and crisis services. She has written and presented extensively on the subject. She is currently studying for her PhD at City University: on the role and value of experiential knowledge in mental health research.

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Family involvement in acute mental health care

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Alison Faulkner carefully considers a recent collaborative conceptual review, which asks why and how families should get involved in acute mental health care.

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The role of pets in supporting people living with mental distress

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Alison Faulkner (and her cats) delight in a recent qualitative study looking at the impact pets can have on the everyday lives of people diagnosed with a long-term mental health condition.

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A social model for understanding madness and distress

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Alison Faulkner on a new Shaping Our Lives report, which addresses service user and survivor views about ways of understanding madness and distress, but in particular about the potential of a social model.

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People’s experiences of taking antidepressants

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Alison Faulkner reflects on the findings of a qualitative study from New Zealand that explores users’ diverse experiences of taking antidepressants.

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Service user involvement in mental health care planning

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Alison Faulkner writes her debut Mental Elf blog about a new qualitative study, which explores how meaningful service user involvement can be integrated into the mental health care planning process.

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