Community treatment orders and social outcomes in psychosis

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Ian Cummins considers the findings of a recent 48-month follow-up study of social outcomes for patients with psychosis, which concludes that community treatment orders did not offer any long term benefits.

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Community treatment orders and personalisation: an unresolvable paradox?

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Ian Cummins explores new research about community treatment orders and the paradox of personalisation under compulsion.

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Community treatment orders still don’t work at 36 months: OCTET trial follow up

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Raphael Underwood presents the 3 year follow up of the OCTET trial of community treatment orders for people with psychosis, which finds no significant difference on readmission or disengagement for patients on CTOs compared to those discharged to voluntary status via Section 17 leave.

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Multiple perspectives on community treatment orders

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In his second blog on community treatment orders, Ian Cummins looks at a UK study on user, carer and practitioner perspectives and critiques the policy.

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Compulsory community treatment results in no significant difference in service use, social functioning or quality of life

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Rebecca Syed appraises and summarises an updated Cochrane review of compulsory community treatment and involuntary outpatient treatment for people with severe mental disorders. The review finds just 3 trials, which show that CCT results in no significant difference in service use, social functioning or quality of life.

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Community treatment orders and the limits of freedom

Erstwhile Mental Elf blogger, Ian Cummins, Senior Lecturer in Social Work at Salford University, joins the Social Care Elf to examine a study on the perspectives of service users, psychiatrists and carers on community treatment orders.

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Community treatment orders simply don’t work

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Community Treatment Orders (CTOs) were introduced in the UK in the last revisions of the Mental Health Act. They are highly controversial, and unpopular amongst the mental health community. They clearly impact on an individual’s Human Rights. Interestingly, they cannot enforce a treatment but can require an individual to return to hospital or a place of treatment. [read the full story…]

Systematic review finds no good evidence to restrict the freedom of people with mental health problems

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Compulsory community treatment (CCT) is a method used in many industrialized nations, including the UK and Australia, that allows clinicians to legally oblige those with severe mental illness to comply with treatment in the community and can allow clinicians to recall them to hospital merely because they are not compliant with an aspect of treatment [read the full story…]

Community treatment orders fail to reduce psychiatric readmissions for people with psychosis

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Community treatment orders (CTO’s) provide compulsory supervision outside of psychiatric hospital. They require patients to accept clinical monitoring in the community and enable them to be recalled to hospital for assessment if necessary. They do not authorise forcible treatment; however whilst on a CTO a patient may be ordered to meet certain requirements, such as [read the full story…]

Community treatment orders for people with severe mental illness: do they work?

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There is controversy as to whether compulsory community treatment (known in the UK as community treatment orders) for people with severe mental illnesses reduces health service use, or improves clinical outcome and social functioning. Given the widespread use of such powers it is important to assess the effects of this type of legislation. Researchers from [read the full story…]