Laura Hemming

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Laura is a PhD student in Manchester where she is looking at causes of aggression and suicide in male prisoners. Her background is in Psychology and she is developing expertise around forensic psychology, mental health in children and young people, and stigma and discrimination. She is also passionate about Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) in research and the accessible and widespread dissemination of research findings.

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Staff views on digital self-management of severe mental illness

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Laura Hemming presents a recent qualitative study of staff views on the use of the Internet and smartphones for digital self-management of severe mental health problems.

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The weekend effect in mental health services: new evidence suggests no increased risk of suicide, inpatient mortality or seclusion

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Laura Hemming reviews two recent studies that investigate whether patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital at the weekend had worse clinical outcomes, as well as the specific weekend versus weekday incidences of suicide in very high-risk mental health patients.

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Self-stigma interventions for people with schizophrenia

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Laura Hemming explores a recent narrative review and meta-analysis of psychosocial interventions for self-stigma in people with a schizophrenia-spectrum diagnosis.

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Street connected children and youth: causes of homelessness in developed and developing countries

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Laura Hemming reports on a recent systematic review and meta-analysis, which explores the causes of child and youth homelessness in developed and developing countries.

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What happens to people after discharge from secure psychiatric hospital?

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Laura Hemming considers a recent systematic review of patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals. The review finds that patients from secure units have a higher chance of mortality and suicide following discharge, than people from other settings.

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IPT and CBT best for depression in children and young people, says network meta-analysis

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Laura Hemming summarises a recent network meta-analysis of psychotherapies for depression in children and young people, which finds that Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) were significantly more efficacious than other psychotherapies at post-treatment and follow-up.

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