After the crisis: self-management and peer-support

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Jenny Collom, Maria Giorgalli and Derek Tracy welcome a new RCT published yesterday in The Lancet which demonstrates the benefits of peer-supported self-management for people discharged from a mental health crisis team.

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The weekend effect in mental health services: new evidence suggests no increased risk of suicide, inpatient mortality or seclusion

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Laura Hemming reviews two recent studies that investigate whether patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital at the weekend had worse clinical outcomes, as well as the specific weekend versus weekday incidences of suicide in very high-risk mental health patients.

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What happens to people after discharge from secure psychiatric hospital?

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Laura Hemming considers a recent systematic review of patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals. The review finds that patients from secure units have a higher chance of mortality and suicide following discharge, than people from other settings.

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Crisis intervention for severe mental illness: Cochrane call for more evidence

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John Baker is struck by the lack of evidence for crisis intervention for people with severe mental illness, highlighted by a recently updated Cochrane systematic review.

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Empowering patients can lead to fewer hospital readmissions, according to small RCT

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Clarissa Giebel presents the findings of a small RCT that evaluates the impact of a social work care coordination intervention on hospital readmissions in older adults.

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Readmission to hospital for people with learning disabilities. A study in one acute hospital in England

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We know that people with learning disabilities have poorer health than those without learning disabilities and may also receive poorer quality healthcare. Emergency or unplanned readmissions may be one indicator of the quality of care.

Here, Pauline Heslop considers a study which looked at such readmissions for people with learning disabilities and those without to see how they compared and how far such readmissions may have been preventable.

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