Results: 60

For: observational study

Measuring physiological changes can help validate emotional states of people with profound learning disabilities

PMLD

The recent publication of Raising Our Sights, the DH report into support for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities set out a challenge for everyone concerned with understanding and responding to people with such disabilities. A number of projects have produced practical guides for involving and engaging with people, for example, Mencap’s Involve Me [read the full story…]

Comparison of stresses associated with parenting children with disabilities shows key differences

Family

There is a body of literature looking at parental stress for parents of children with disabilities, but the researchers in this Canadian study were interested in looking specifically at a comparison of parental stress for parents of children with foetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) and those with children with autism spectrum disorder. They reported the [read the full story…]

Reducing variation in prescribing activities in primary care

Doctor holding up a prescription form

  Introduction This study, carried out in Scotland, is relevant to commissioners and general practitioners, as it demonstrates why there are variations in prescribing practice, and how these can be managed. The authors have noticed that there is “significant variation in the quality of prescribing” and they have carried out an ethnographic study into why [read the full story…]

Missing you Mum: mothers who bring their babies to emergency departments often have undetected post-natal depression

Photo courtesy of ADS Ltd

While depression is the leading cause of disability for both males and females, the burden of depression is 50% higher for females. In fact, depression is the leading cause of disease burden for women in both high-income and low- and middle-income countries (WHO, 2008). Research has shown that women with unidentified and untreated maternal depression [read the full story…]

Staff in residential services recognise importance of setting communication goals to improve quality of life but lack consistent guidelines

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BILD’s communication factsheet suggests that estimates of the proportion of people with learning disabilities who have difficulties with communication vary between 50% and 90%. For many people with learning disabilities, this communication will be non-verbal, or working at a pre-lingual level, which mean the use of many means including gesture, facial expression, sign language, picture [read the full story…]

The links between passive smoking and dementia: findings from a new cross-sectional study

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Over 1 billion people on Earth smoke tobacco. WHO figures tell us that 80% of the smoking population live in low-middle income countries, most of which are not protected by any kind of smoke-free public health legislation. China is a particular black-spot in this regard. It has the largest tobacco smoking population in the world [read the full story…]

Relationships identified between emotions, attributions and interpersonal style of staff supporting people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour

Supporter

There have been a number of studies testing attributions of support staff and their impact on helping behaviour when supporting people with learning disabilities anf challenging behaviour. We posted about one such study in January this year which looked at the impact of using vignettes to measure helping behaviour and used Weiner’s theory to explain [read the full story…]

Image based hyperlink menus on websites improved understanding of site users with learning disabilities

When we think of community involvement and participation in the 21st century, it is impossible not to consider the importance of access to information technology and the use  of social media as key elements of this. The Rix Centre  for example has worked over a number of years to improve access for people with learning [read the full story…]

Multi-sensory environment reduced stereotyped behaviour for young people with learning disabilities

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Multi-sensory environments or snoezelen rooms are used in a variety of services supporting people with learning disabilities although there has until recently been a paucity of critical evaluation of their effectiveness. Although there are a number of examples in the literature of a wide range of positive outcomes when Snoezelen and  non-Snoezelen environments are contrasted, there [read the full story…]

Heart rate and skin temperature offer insights into emotions of people with profound learning disabilities

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The late Jim Mansell recently identified the need for all of us supporting people with profound learning disabilities to ‘raise our sights’ in ensuring better quality support and subsequently better outcomes requires a significant amount of skill  (see Raising our Sights)  Projects like Mencap’s Involve Me offer a range of resources aiming to break down [read the full story…]