Tackling mental-health-related stigma: a narrative review of anti-stigma interventions

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Suzanne Dash considers the findings of a recent narrative review in The Lancet, which brought together the evidence for effective interventions to reduce mental-health-related stigma and discrimination.

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Staff understanding of recovery-orientated mental health practice: A critical note of caution?

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Andrew Shepherd considers the findings of a recent systematic review and narrative synthesis, which looks at staff understanding of recovery-orientated mental health practice.

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Psychodynamic therapy: time for a new approach?

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Mark Smith summarises a recent narrative review about the effectiveness of psychodynamic therapy for depression, anxiety disorders, eating disorders, somatic disorders and other mental health conditions.

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Preventing the sexual abuse of children with learning disabilities; knowledge is power

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In this post, Sian Anderson considers a narrative review of literature that focused on the sexual abuse of children with learning disabilities, looking at the extent and nature of such abuse and reactions to it.

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Experiences of the osteoarthritis GP consultation, attitudes and beliefs to OA

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Do GPs tell people that osteoarthritis or ‘wear and tear’ is a normal part of ageing and nothing can be done? This recent narrative review sought to find out.

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Is suicide contagious? Definition and epidemiology of suicide clusters

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Mark Smith summarises a recent narrative synthesis of research looking at the definition and epidemiology of suicide clusters.

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Dementia through the eyes of a carer: What would you want for your relative?

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Josephine Neale summarises a recent review of qualitative evidence that finds carers’ views are mixed and lie on a spectrum of acceptance of their relative as actively dying with dementia.

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Intensive cognitive training may help to prevent cognitive decline

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Cognitive decline describes increasing problems with memory, comprehension, language and mental agility. Mild cognitive impairment means that a person has cognitive decline beyond that which might be expected for their age, but generally do not experience problems with everyday living (Alzheimer’s Society, 2012). Dementia has similar symptoms, but these are more severe and people with [read the full story…]