Tayla McCloud

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Tayla is a PhD student in UCL’s Division of Psychiatry. For her PhD she is conducting the longitudinal cohort study SENSE, which is investigating the mental health of UCL students. Previously, she completed an MSc in Clinical Mental Health Sciences and worked as a Research Assistant on various randomised controlled trials. She has a particular interest in the mental health of young people, specifically depression and anxiety.

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Universal interventions to prevent mental illness in medical students

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Tayla McCloud summarises a systematic review and meta-analysis on the effectiveness of universal programmes for the prevention of suicidal ideation, behaviour and mental ill health in medical students.

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Predictors of adherence to digital interventions for psychosis

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Joe Barnby and Muna Dubad explore a recent systematic review that looks at the potential predictors of adherence to web-based and mobile technologies for people with psychosis.

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Physical activity and depression: new review confirms high levels of sedentary behaviour

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Tayla McCloud summarises a recent systematic review and meta-analysis of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, which found that more than two-thirds of people with depression did not comply with the recommendation of 150 minutes of physical activity per week.

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Preventing depression in low-income mothers: Head Start RCT in the community

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Tayla McCloud appraises the recent Head Start randomised controlled trial measuring the efficacy of a maternal depression prevention strategy.

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Antipsychotic overprescribing in people with learning disabilities #UCLJournalClub

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Tayla McCloud from the #UCLJournalClub presents the findings of a cohort study showing that antipsychotics are being over-prescribed in people with learning disabilities.

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