Results: 48

For: advocacy

How “Big Society” is experienced in the lives of people with learning disabilities: Austerity, broken promises and cruel optimism

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Big Society? Disabled people with learning disabilities and civil society is a project funded by the Economic and Social research council (June, 2013 – September, 2015).

The project is a collaboration between universities and organisations of and for people with learning disabilities, further details can be found at: www.bigsocietydis.wordpress.com

Here, just as the project shares its findings at a national conference, Katherine Runswick Cole sets the scene and Silvana Mengoni posts about one of the published papers from the project.

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Safe and social – helping learning disabled people improve skills and understanding

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Some people with learning disabilities may find it difficult to learn social rules and behaviours, which can impact on involvement and engagement in their commnunities.

In her debut blog, Mandy Johnson looks at a project in the Republic of Ireland which set out to help people consider the desirability of a range of social behaviours and the complexities of social context.

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Using actors with learning disabilities during training to improve doctors’ communication and diagnostic skills

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Poor communication between people with learning disabilities, their carers and health professionals has been cited as an element of the explanation of health inequalities faced by people with learning disabilities.

In his debut blog, Tom Crossland looks at one study which used actors with learning disabilities as ‘standardised patients’ in the training of medical students in order to see if this might improve communication and diagnostic skills.

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Self-concept amongst adults with mild learning disabilities is good, but can be strengthened with practitioner support

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A positive self concept has been associated with psychological well-being, peer acceptance and self-confidence, but how do people with mild learning disabilities view themselves?

In this, his debut blog, Alex Leeder looks at a qualitative study that set out to provide us with a deeper understanding of how adults with learning disabilities think about themselves and how practitioners could help them to think about this more positively.

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Advocacy support for parents with learning disabilities – is it cost effective?

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Around 7% of people with learning disabilities are parents, but they face significantly increased risks of being involved in care proceedings being more likely than other parents to lose the care of their children.

Here, in her Debut blog, Katherine Runswick-Cole looks at a study of the potential economic case for the provision of advocacy interventions to support parents with learning disabilities.

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“There’s no need to laugh. Isn’t this a normal subject?” People with learning disabilities talking about sex and relationships

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People with learning disabilities need to be able to talk about sexuality, sex and relationships, but often this opportunity is denied or is heavily influenced by existing social and cultural norms.

In this, her debut blog, Michelle Gregory looks at a paper which reports on how one self advocacy group tackled this issue and how they disseminated their findings.

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Sex education programmes focused on ‘protection’ and ‘prevention’ with little attention given to supporting people to develop healthy, positive sexual relationships

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Knowledge about sexuality is a key factor in helping people develop healthy relationships, maintain their sexual health and avoid potentially abusive situations, but how much do sexuality education programmes for people with learning disabilities help fulfil these aims?

In her debut blog, Sian Anderson looks at a review of literature which looks at the effectiveness of sex education programmes and educational materials developed for people with mild or moderate learning disabilities.

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Equipping family carers with better information about in-patient assessment and treatment for people with learning disabilities

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We know that access to accurate information is crucial if people are to make good decisions about the support they get from services. If someone with a learning disability is admitted to a hospital unit for assessment or treatment for a mental health issue or in response to behaviour that is challenging support services, this can be a particularly difficult and confusing time for all concerned.

In her debut blog, Alison Giraud-Saunders, along with co-author Angela Cole, describes a booklet that she co-authored with the involvement of family members which has lots of key information on the law and people’s rights.

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