Eleanor Kennedy

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Eleanor is a PhD student in the Tobacco and Alcohol Research Group (TARG) at the University of Bristol. She has completed a BA in Psychology at University College Cork and an MSc in Neuropsychology at Maastricht University. Previously she worked as a research assistant at the Institute of Psychiatry (King’s College London) on the IMAGEN Study. Her research interests include traumatic brain injury and risk behaviour engagement in adolescence.

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Childhood traumatic brain injuries predict risk of poor long-term outcomes

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Eleanor Kennedy reports on a nationwide Swedish cohort study, which finds that traumatic brain injury consistently predicted later risk of premature mortality, psychiatric inpatient admission, psychiatric outpatient visits, disability pension, welfare recipiency and low educational attainment.

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Treatment for depression in traumatic brain injury: Cochrane find no evidence for non-pharmacological interventions

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Eleanor Kennedy summarises a recent Cochrane systematic review, which finds no evidence to support the use of non-pharmacological interventions for depression in traumatic brain injury.

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Medication for cognitive impairment in traumatic brain injury: little evidence to support its use

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Eleanor Kennedy summarises a recent Cochrane review of pharmacotherapy for chronic cognitive impairment in traumatic brain injury, which finds insufficient evidence to support its use.

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Supervised injectable heroin for refractory heroin addiction

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Eleanor Kennedy considers a new systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs of diamorphine-prescribing as treatment for refractory heroin addiction.

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CBT for substance misuse in young people

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Eleanor Kennedy summarises a Campbell systematic review of CBT for substance misuse in young people in outpatient treatment, which is inconclusive in terms of CBT being more or less effective than other therapies.

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High potency cannabis and the risk of psychosis

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Eleanor Kennedy writes her debut blog on a recent case-control study of people in South London, which explores the links between first-episode psychosis and the use of high potency cannabis (skunk).

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