Pulpotomy for permanent teeth with irreversible pulpitis?

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This review of success rates of coronal pulpotomy in carious teeth with signs and symptoms indicative of irreversible pulpitis included 8 studies only one of which was a RCT. The data suggest this this procedure may be an alternative to root canal treatment.

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Pulpotomy for permanent teeth

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This review of the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of pulpotomy and associated medicaments in permanent teeth with pulp exposure included 17 RCTs some os which are still ongoing. The findings suggest that pulpotomy may be a potential treatment option for permanent teeth but more research is needed.

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Irreversible pulpitis: What is the most effective local anaesthetic for inferior alveolar nerve block?

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This review of the most effective anaesthetic solutions for inferior alveolar nerve blocks for mandibular teeth with irreversible pulpitis included 11 RCTs. The findings suggest that mepivacaine with epinephrine performed better than lidocaine with epinephrine but the number of trials is limited and the quality of evidence was very low to moderate.

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Dexamethasone for post endodontic pain

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This review of dexamethasone for controlling pain following endodontic treatment included 5 relatively small RCTs . The findings suggest statistically significant reduction of pain in patients receiving dexamethasone at 8,12, and 24 hours.

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Inferior alveolar nerve block: can NSAIDs improve anaesthetic success?

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This review of the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as premedication on the success of inferior alveolar nerve block includes 13 RCTs suggesting NSAIDs have a positive impact on success.

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Primary molars: Hall technique most effective caries management option

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3 caries management options [conventional restorations (CR), the hall technique (HT), and non-restorative caries treatment (NRCT)] were investigated in this RCT. A 93% success rate was seen for the HT at 2.5 years compares with 70% for NRCT and 67% for CR.

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Little evidence for antibiotic use in irreversible pulpitis

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This is the latest update of this Cochrane review of the effectiveness of antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis. Only 1 small RCTs is available which provides insufficient evidence to determine whether antibiotics reduce pain or not compared to not having antibiotics

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Articaine better than lidocaine for supplementary infiltration after mandibular block anaesthesia

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10 studies involving 746 adult patients were included in this review comparing articaine and lidocaine in patients with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Articaine was as effective as lidocaine and provided better supplementary infiltration after mandibular block but no other advantages.

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Currently insufficient evidence to decide if antibiotics are effective in treating irreversible pulpitis

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Irreversible pulpitis often presents as an acute and intense pain and is a frequent reason for emergency dental visits.  Treatment involves accessing the root canal of the tooth to remove the inflamed pulp (nerve) and cleaning the root canal. The aim of this review was to assess the effects of systemic antibiotics for irreversible pulpitis. [read the full story…]

Supplementary injections to increase numbers of patients receiving pain-free dental treatment

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Unfortunately for patients  with irreversible pulpitis inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) is not always successful in achieving satisfactory levels of anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of supplementary repeat inferior alveolar nerve block with 2% lidocaine and epinephrine, buccal infiltration with 4% articaine with epinephrine, intraligamentary injection, or intraosseous injection [read the full story…]