The case for social-emotional competence: essential skills for school and life? #MHED2018

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Michael Wigelsworth summarises a review by Celene Domitrovich on social-emotional competence, which she describes as an essential factor in promoting positive adjustment and reducing risk in children.

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Parent training works for child and adolescent mental health

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Tony McGinn presents a high-level overview of the state of parent training evidence. His blog draws on over 30 systematic reviews with meta-analyses, to bring you a handy summary of what works.

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Incredible Years Parent Training has a role in improving outcomes for all children

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Fiona Warner-Gale presents the findings of a meta-analytic review of the Incredible Years Parent Training programme, which is found to be effective at modifying disruptive and prosocial child behaviour. This evidence will be of interest to many, including policymakers, planners and practitioners.

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Targeted mental health support can improve borderline-clinical behavioural problems in children

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The statistic that one in four adults in Britain will experience a mental health problem in any given year is well known (if still debated), but a recent report by the Children and Young People’s Mental Health Coalition revealed a lack of such statistics for children. The report also highlighted that Office for National Statistics [read the full story…]

Extraneous risk factors play role in differences in self-reporting of anti-social behaviour among adolescents with and without mild to moderate learning disabilities

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Background Anti-social behaviour is a key issue of public concern with significant numbers of people reporting behaviours such as vandalism, graffiti and litter as problems in their local area. The Crime and Disorder Act (1998) defines anti-social behaviour as ‘Acting in a manner that caused or was likely to cause harassment, alarm or distress to [read the full story…]

NICE publish first guideline for conduct disorders and antisocial behaviour in children and young people

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Conduct disorders are the most common reason why children are referred to mental health services and it’s estimated that around 5% of all UK children aged 5-16 have a diagnosis of the condition. Around half of the young people affected by conduct disorders go on to have a serious mental health problem as an adult. [read the full story…]