Josephine Neale

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Josephine Neale is a Specialist Registrar in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry in London. She completed her medical degree at University College London and has also completed a degree in Physiology and Pharmacology. Before pursuing a career in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Josephine trained in General Adult Psychiatry, Old Age Psychiatry and Psychiatry of Intellectual Disabilities. In addition to clinical work, she has a particular interest in medical education.


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Prescribing antipsychotics in primary care: new study highlights frequent off-label use


Josephine Neale reports on a recent cohort study that finds less than half of UK prescriptions for antipsychotics are issued for main licensed conditions (e.g. psychosis or bipolar disorder). The research provides a reminder about the dangers of prescribing antipsychotics to people with dementia.

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Risk factors for dementia: separating the facts from the myths


We are grateful to Josephine Neale who has read the 104 page World Alzheimer Report 2014 and summarised it for us in this very readable blog. The report is a comprehensive analysis of the risk factors for dementia, which focuses on a range of protective and modifiable factors.

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How do we make a diagnosis? Screening tools for anxiety disorders


Josephine Neale blogs about a systematic review of screening tools for anxiety disorders, which concludes that the GAD-7 and PHQ instruments are appropriate for use in primary care.

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Dementia through the eyes of a carer: What would you want for your relative?


Josephine Neale summarises a recent review of qualitative evidence that finds carers’ views are mixed and lie on a spectrum of acceptance of their relative as actively dying with dementia.

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Are there any effective interventions for preventing falls in older people with mental health problems?


Falls are estimated to cost the NHS more than £2.3 billion per year (College of Optometrists, 2011) and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This fact alone should be giving us the drive to look for ways to prevent falls in healthcare settings. A systematic review recently published in BMC Nursing (Bunn et al, 2014) is [read the full story…]