Flowable composites: clinical performance in non-carious cervical lesions

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Kenny Strain takes a look at this recent review of flowable composite use in non-carious cervical lesions. 8 small RCTs of low quality were included with the authors suggesting flowable composites have improved marginal adaptation at 1 and 3 years.

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EDTA conditioning improved cervical restoration retention

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This trial involving 48 patients found that EDTA conditioning improved the retention of restoration in non-carious cervical lesions at 18 months.

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Toothbrushing: little data on association with gingival recession

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This review considered the association between toothbrushing and gingival recession and non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs). 19 studies were included a majority (13) were cross-sectional and they provide limited data to support or refute the associations.

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Cervical composite resin restorations: bevel or not?

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The number of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) that will require management in the future is expected to increase. This review was only able to identify 4 RCTs looking at whether bevelling the enamel margin improves retention, so there is limited evidence for the clinician.

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Review finds glass ionomer had lowest annual failure rate in non-carious cervical lesions

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Non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) are saucer or wedge-shaped defects that appear along the cementum-enamel junction as a result of gradual loss of dental tissues in the absence of caries. Their aetiology has not been fully clarified. NCCLs are restored using adhesive materials glass-ionomers and their resin-modified version, poly-acid modified composites (known as ‘compomers’), composite and [read the full story…]

Review suggests that glass ionomers had best retention rates in non-carious cervical lesions

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The aetiology of non-carious cervical lesions  (NCCLs) has not been fully clarified but they are characterised by a slow and gradual loss of mineralized dental tissue in the absence of dental caries. This results in a saucer or wedge-shaped defect that appears along the cementum–enamel Junction.   The aim of this review was to assess the [read the full story…]

Lack of evidence to support an association between occlusal risk factors and non-carious cervical lesions

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Loss of tooth surface in the cervical areas of the tooth unrelated to caries, or non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL) have been reported to occur in prevalences of between 5-85%.  These lesions can be the result of attrition, abrasion or erosion. The potential of occlusal stress to be a factor leading to abfraction has also been [read the full story…]