Bruxism: Are botulinum toxin injections helpful?

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Only 5 small low quality studies were included in this review of botulinum toxin (BoNT-A ) injections for sleep bruxism. 3 of the included studies were RCTs and while a potential benefit from use of BoNT-A treatment was suggested the findings should be treated very cautiously.

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Trigeminal neuralgia: is botulinum toxin effective?

Behavioural signs such as grimacing, guarding, resistance to care, pacing/rocking etc will give clues to the fact that a person with dementia is in pain

Six small RCTs were included in this review. Findings suggest that botulinum toxin type A (BoTN-A) has a positive effect on post treatment pain. Hover the results should be interpreted cautiously as the quality of the evidence is limited and more high quality studies are needed.

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Sleep bruxism: little evidence for management

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The review of sleep bruxism was only able to identify 12 small low quality RCTs covering a range of treatments. Most evidence was available for oral appliances but there is no sufficient evidence to state that the occlusal splint is effective for treating sleep bruxism.

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Temporomandibular disorders: is botulinum toxin effective?

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This review of botulinum toxin (BTX) for treating temporomandibular disorders identified 5 RCTs involving a total of 117 patients. There was marked heterogeneity between the studies and the therapeutic benefits are unclear. Well reported high quality RCTs are needed.

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Botulinum toxin for bruxism

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Bruxism can be classified as primary (idiopatic) or secondary (iatrogenic).  While secondary bruxism is associated with medical conditions (e.g. neurologic, psychiatric, sleep disorders medication), primary bruxism ( which includes clenching and sleep bruxism ) is not. Dental treatments for bruxism include occlusion adjustment, tooth surface restoration, and orthodontic treatment. These interventions are extensive and irreversible [read the full story…]

Interventions for drooling in children with cerebral palsy

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Drooling is a common problem for children with cerebral palsy (CP). Drooling varies in severity and can be distressing for the children, families and caregivers. It can cause chapped or sore skin around the mouth and chin, skin and mouth infections, dehydration, difficulties chewing and a range of other social issues.  The main aim of [read the full story…]