Root resorption: high incidence after replantation of avulsed teeth

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This review evaluating the incidence of root resorption (RR) after the replantation of avulsed teeth included 23 studies of low quality providing a estimate of RR that should be viewed cautiously.

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External root resorption diagnosis: cone-beam computed tomography or periapical radiographs?

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15 in-vitro studies were included in this review of CBCT & periapical radiographs for the diagnosis of external root resorption. It suggests that CBCT performs better however further research is needed the clinical an cost -effectiveness of its use.

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Root resorption – no evidence for the effectiveness of available treatments

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This Cochrane review was seeking to identify RCTs of interventions for the management of external root resorption in permanent teeth. No published trials were identified, so clinicians must decide on the most appropriate means of managing this condition according to their clinical experience with regard to patient-related factors.

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Review suggests that autotransplantation of teeth with complete root formation have favourable outcomes

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Autotransplantation of teeth has been carried out for many years and the 1990s saw clarification of the prognosis and risk factors together with proposed standard surgical procedures.  The aim of this review was to assess the outcomes of autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation and the effects of various influencing factors. Searches were conducted in [read the full story…]

Scant evidence to assess whether root-filled teeth are more at risk of external root resorption during orthodontic treatment

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Orthodontically induced external apical root resorption (OIEARR) has been classified as surface resorption caused by loss of cementum.  Usually this is superficial and unidentifiable radiographically but if this occurs apically it can be seen as shortening of the tooth.  Typically OIEARR is less than 2mm and clinically insignificant. OIEARR greater than 4mm is severe and [read the full story…]