No single systemic treatment was found to be effective for treatment of mouth ulcers

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The prevalence of mouth ulcers (recurrent aphthous stomatitis , RAS) has been estimated at between 5 – 60%. They can be painful and slow to heal.  There are three recognized forms; minor, major and herpetiform.  The peak age at onset is between 10 and 19 years of age but they can persist through adulthood. The [read the full story…]

No well-designed studies of topical agents for treatment of HIV-related oral ulcers

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Oral Ulcers occur more frequently, last longer and produce more painful symptoms in HIV-infected adults. Aphthous ulcers are generally classified as major, minor or herpetiform. Major ulcers can exceed 3cm in diameter and can develop into large necrotic lesions. Major ulcers are seen more commonly in HIV-infected than non-infected adults.  The aim of this Cochrane [read the full story…]

Study shows dexamethasone ointment had positive effect on recurrent aphthous ulceration

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Yesterday we looked at a study that looked at multivitamins for the treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Today we have another study whose aim was to explore the efficacy and safety of dexamethasone ointment in the treatment of RAS.  What did they do This was a multi-centre trail conducted across 5 centres in China. [read the full story…]

Stress associated with onset of recurrent mouth ulcers

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Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common and painful oral disease. It is characterised by recurring mucosal ulceration in an otherwise healthy individual.  Its prevalence is commonly estimated to be between 5% and 25%  with a peak age of onset between 10 and 19 years although they may continue throughout the patient’s life span.  An [read the full story…]

Robust studies needed to evaluate topical agents available to treat HIV related oral ulcers

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HIV/AIDS is currently the leading cause of death in adults in Africa and the sixth leading cause of death worldwide. In HIV infected adults, oral ulcers occur more frequently, last longer, and produce more painful symptoms than in immunocompetent people.  The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of topical [read the full story…]

Using ice chips reduces oral mucositis in patients undergoing chemotherapy

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Cancer treatment is increasingly effective but is associated with short and long term side effects. Oral side effects remain a major source of illness despite the use of a variety of agents to prevent them. One of these side effects is oral mucositis (mouth ulcers). The aim of this study was to assess the effect [read the full story…]