Results: 30

For: cardiovascular disease

Collaboration, collaboration, collaboration


Kirsten Lawson explores the benefits of working across professional and therapeutic boundaries, highlighted beautifully by the recent COINCIDE RCT of collaborative care for patients with depression comorbid with diabetes or cardiovascular disease.

[read the full story...]

Infective endocarditis prophylaxis – NICE reaffirms 2008 guidance


NICE has completed a review of its 2008 guidance on antimicrobial prophylaxis against infective endocarditis following the publication of a recent study. NICE found no need to change any of its existing guidance.

[read the full story...]

Periodontal disease and coronary disease risk

shutterstock_113989924  - periodontitis

15 prospective studies were included in this review of periodontal disease (PD) & coronary disease risk. PD was associated with an increased risk of coronary disease RR=1.19; (95% CI; 1.13–1.26).

[read the full story...]

How much impact can optimism and positivity have on clinical outcomes in cardiovascular disease?


Jake Crawshaw summarises a systematic review which investigates the relationships between positive psychological constructs and health outcomes in cardiovascular disease.

[read the full story...]

Bridging the gap: low intensity collaborative care for patients with recent cardiac events can improve mental health and quality of life

shutterstock_the gap

There are many interfaces in mental health services, such as the one between physical and mental health. Where there are interfaces, there are inevitably gaps for patients to fall through. Consequently opportunities are missed to treat mental health problems in those with physical health problems. There is mounting evidence for the effectiveness of Collaborative Care (CC) [read the full story…]

Financial incentives don’t increase depression screening for patients with chronic illness


The lines between physical health and mental health are blurred in lots of ways, and one example is the fact that people with chronic physical conditions are also more likely to suffer from depression. As well as adding to their burden of illness, there’s also some evidence that those patients with comorbid depression have worse [read the full story…]

Do interventions proven to improve cardiovascular disease outcomes work for individuals with severe mental illness?

shutterstock_high blood pressure

Individuals with severe mental illness (SMI) have shortened life expectancies compared to the general population. This is partly down to higher rates of chronic physical illness. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among patients using mental health services. It is assumed that interventions used to reduce CVD are similarly effective in patients with [read the full story…]

Post-ACS depression treatment more effective when led by patient preference

The role of patient choice was a critical component of this study

Patients who suffer from depression after acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may benefit from stepped treatment, which takes patient preference into account, a recent study suggests. Furthermore this course of action does not appear to result in a significant increase in healthcare costs. Crucially post-ACS depression has been associated with both an increased risk of ACS [read the full story…]

Treatment of depression after a heart attack does not improve the long-term risk of adverse cardiac events but may increase survival

shutterstock_heart and doctor

Although there have been huge advances in the treatment of heart disease, it is still the UK’s biggest killer (more information on heart disease can be found at the British Heart Foundation’s website). Depression after a heart attack is common (roughly 20% prevalence) and can worsen heart disease and increase the risk of death.  A [read the full story…]

Healthy Active Lives (HeAL): tackling premature death in young people with psychosis

Teenage girl holding up her hand

The Healthy Active Lives (HeAL) international consensus statement aims to reverse the trend of people with severe mental illness dying early by tackling risks for future physical illnesses pro-actively and much earlier. The statement is being launched today by the Royal College of Psychiatrists, at a special event focusing on achieving parity between mental and [read the full story…]