substance misuse

A drug is a chemical substance that acts on the brain and nervous system, changing a person’s mood, emotion or state of consciousness. Drugs are often classified by the effect they have.
Stimulants, such as cocaine, make people feel full of energy. Depressants (or sedatives), such as heroin, make people feel relaxed. Hallucinogens, such as LSD, make people see, feel or hear things that are not real. Drug or substance misuse is when a person regularly takes one or more drugs to change their mood, emotion or state of consciousness.

Our substance misuse Blogs

New NICE guidance on dual diagnosis: sterile or infectious?

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Ian Hamilton and Mark Holland appraise new NICE guidance on dual diagnosis. Their blog highlights the ongoing inequity in service provision for people with serious mental illness and comorbid substance misuse.

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NICE one? Is NHS guidance on substance misuse fit for purpose?

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Ian Hamilton explains why the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence have missed a trick by not updating their 2007 guidance on psychosocial interventions for substance misuse.

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Substance misuse and addiction in people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

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Andrew Jones summarises a recent Canadian cohort study, which explores the extent of substance misuse and addictive disorders among adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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OCD risk may increase following perinatal complications

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Alan Underwood summarises a population based cohort study of 2.4 million Swedish children, which highlights links between perinatal risk factors such as smoking during pregnancy, and later development of obsessive compulsive disorder.

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Cannabis use during pregnancy: little known about impact on child or maternal health

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Ellen Grimas summarises a systematic review on prenatal exposure to cannabis and maternal and child health outcomes, which highlights the lack of high quality research in this area.

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Cognitive bias modification for addiction: are we flogging a dead horse?

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Matt Field considers a recent meta-analysis that explores the effectiveness of Cognitive Bias Modification interventions for substance addictions.

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Alcohol brief interventions: how can content, provider and setting reduce alcohol consumption?

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Olivia Maynard considers the findings of a recent systematic review that evaluates the effectiveness of alcohol brief interventions in reducing consumption. The review focuses specifically on the impact of the intervention content, provider group and setting.

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Sex matters: why have females been excluded from addiction research?

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Ian Hamilton explores two recent articles that consider the shocking sex and gender inequities in addiction research.

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Have the EAGLES landed? Safety of varenicline, bupropion and NRT in smokers with and without mental illnesses

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Paul Christiansen presents the results of the EAGLES RCT into the neuropsychiatric safety and efficacy of varenicline, bupropion, and nicotine patches in smokers with and without psychiatric disorders.

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