Using liquid resin reduced lingual orthodontic retainer failure rate

iStock_000002551343XSmall colourful braces on teeth

Long -term retention is necessary to avoid relapse following the completion of orthodontic treatment. The lingual retainer can be a useful method of retention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of liquid resin on the survival of fixed lingual retainers and to evaluate the incidence of calculus accumulation and discoloration adjacent to the lingual retainers.

 What did they do

Fifty-two patients (26 males, 26 females) were randomized  into one of two groups The resin group had lingual retainers bonded to the enamel surfaces with two-step bonding technique Those in the non-resin group Over a 2-year observation period, Retainer failure, calculus accumulation, and discoloration of composite pads adjacent to the retainers were recorded.

 What did they find

  • There was a statistically significant difference in the failure rate between the two groups retainer failure was 4%  in the resin group  and 27% non-resin group (P = .049).
  • The incidence of calculus accumulation (31%) and discoloration (69%) adjacent to the composite pads was significantly higher in the non-resin group.

 They concluded

Application of resin in bonding of lingual retainers appears to reduce the incidence of retainer failure as well as the incidence of calculus accumulation and discoloration adjacent to the composite pads

Bazargani F, Jacobson S, Lennartsson B. A comparative evaluation of lingual retainer failure bonded with or without liquid resin. Angle Orthod. 2012 Jan;82(1):84-7. Epub 2011 Jul 1. PubMed PMID: 21721947.

 

 

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Derek Richards

Derek Richards is the Director of the Centre for Evidence-based Dentistry, Editor of the Evidence-based Dentistry Journal, Consultant in Dental Public Health with Forth Valley Health Board and Honorary Senior Lecturer at Dundee & Glasgow Dental Schools. He helped to establish both the Centre for Evidence-based Dentistry and the Evidence-based Dentistry Journal. He has been involved with teaching EBD and a wide range of evidence-based initiatives both nationally and internationally since 1994.

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